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Brokerage Way Corp..... is any issue here? How does it look for native?

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Hi, Serg, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Unfortunately, everything you have written in your post is filled with grammatical errors, and it is very difficult to decipher the question that you are trying to ask. Best wishes in your English studies!Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

"not" in a series?

Here's the original sentence: "Any child not picked up or allowed to walk home on their own prior to the conclusion of the program will be considered unattended." This is what was meant: "Any child not 1) picked up or 2) allowed to walk home on their own prior to the conclusion of the program will be considered unattended." But I think it should have been written like this... "Any child not picked up or not allowed to walk home on their own prior to the conclusion of the program will be...Read More...
Hello, Dave, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! As the sentence is written, it is indeed ambiguous: we can't tell whether "allowed" falls under the scope of "not." In other words, we can't tell whether "or allowed to walk home" refers to a child who is not allowed to walk home or to one who is allowed to walk home. One way to disambiguate the sentence is the way you have suggested. You can repeat the word "not" before "allowed." Another way you could disambiguate the sentence is by...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

what or where

Hello, 1.What are you watching? I’m watching a horror movie . 2.Where are you working? I’m working in my office. 3.Where are you cleaning? I’m cleaning the kitchen In order to find out the underlined part, we use a question word. In sentences 1,”a horror movie” is the object of the sentence and a question word “What” works fine. In sentence 2,” in my office” is not the object but a modifier, telling the asker the place where I’m working, so a question word “where” is OK. What about sentences...Read More...
Thank you, always, David. AppleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

Simple or complex sentence

"Based on the well-documented experiences of contemporary peers as well as those of past figures in the political arena, many of whom saw their professional reputations and their personal lives deeply and negatively affected as a consequence of releasing their own memoirs upon completing their tenures in leading public positions, the newly retired four-star general, whom, at his farewell press conference, the president himself had taken the time to praise as his most valuable asset in his...Read More...
What else could the nonrestrictive clauses be dependent on? Is your view that they are dependent on something that is not present in the sentence? Or is it rather that they are not dependent clauses at all? Presumably, there are only two choices: dependent or independent. If they are not dependent clauses, they must be independent clauses, capable of being stand-alone sentences unto themselves. Do you find these to be sentences? Many of whom saw their professional reputations and their...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

involved

Hello everyone, 1. What is a project team and who all are involved ? souece: https://www.invensislearning.c...who-all-are-involved I think "involved" here means "committed or engaged": The civil rights demonstration attracted the involved young people of the area. 2. The trouble was, however, that it was so concerned and involved and relevant and all together and right-on. — Cleveland Amory, TV Guide, 13 Mar. 1971 I think "involved" here means "complicated" Now my question, ... Pro: Exactly!Read More...

Is this Correct?

It's a door hanger that will be placed on the door knobs around an Open House that we're doing. Is it Neighbors' Open House or Neighbor's Open House or Neighbors Open House? HELPRead More...
Hi, JSlotnick, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! An open house for one neighbor is a neighbor's open house. An open house for more than one neighbor is your neighbors' open house. In the context you've described, I recommend " neighborhood open house ."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

when available

A: We need to have dinner together sometime. B: I agree, but I don't know ________. a. when available b. when I'll be available Are they both correct? Thank!Read More...
Hi, Kis, Only (b) is correct. Embedded or indirect questions cannot be reduced. Such reduction can only take place when the clause functions as an adverbial, for example: - Come when available (= Come when you are available).Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

who do that

A says: Some people jog in our neighborhood late at night. B replies: a. Those are young people. b. That is young people. c. It is young people. d. Those are young people who do that. e. That is young people who do that. f. It is young people who do that/ g. They are young people who do that. Which of the sentences a-f are grammatically correct in this context? Many thanksRead More...
Hi, Azz, I only find (a) and (f) to be grammatically correct. While in (a) "those" refers to the people the other peson mentioned (the ones who jog in the neighborhood late at night), (f) is a cleft sentence used for emphasis. I think (b) would be possible with a comma: b'. That is, young people ("that is" has a reformulatory value and is used to correct the other speaker's claim: not any kind of people, but only those who are young).Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Correct or not?

Correct or not? This is the first time for her to visit London.Read More...
Hi, Abo Hamza, Your question sounds somewhat imperative, as if you were saying: Tell me: is it correct or not? which I hope was not your intention. Next time, it'd be better for you to use a more polite formula, like: Could you (please) tell me if this is correct? In answer to your question, although this sentence: is correct, these others would perhaps be more idiomatic and natural: - This is her first time to visit London. - This is the first time she's visited London. - This is the first...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

predicate adjective?

When is an adjective not an adjective? I came across this quiz on intransitive linking verbs. “The meal tasted wonderful to everyone.” Tasted being the linking verb, linking wonderful to meal. As wonderful is an adjective, I presumed wonderful would be a predicate adjective. The correct answer is that wonderful is a predicate nominative? As a predicate nominative is a noun, I am a little confused. Would you please give me an explanation. Link question three. ...Read More...
Thank you all for taking the time to answer my questions. I think there may be some ambiguity in the quiz. Once again, many thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By Raymond. · First Unread Post

Which hotel are you staying (in/at)?

Hello, Which hotel are you staying? Do you need "at" or "in" at the end of the sentence above? We cannot say " I'm staying Hilton" so, technically, we need a preposition "in" or "at", but do you say the sentence in question in a daily conversation without a preposition? I think I've heard it said without, but I'm not sure if it's grammatically acceptable. AppleRead More...
Thank you, David. Your reply always confirms my opinion or sometimes makes me realize my wrong perception or mistakes. AppleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

Would you like A (,)or B? Do we need a comma?

Hello, 1. Would you like tea or coffee? (rising intonation) 2. Would you like tea(rising intonation) or coffee (falling intonation) When spoken, sentence 1 asks if you want something to drink, like tea or coffee, so you answer by yes or no. When the speaker raises the intonation after "tea" and brings it down after coffee, he is asking which beverage you want, tea or coffee, so you tell him your preference. When this sentence is in a written form and you want to know the preference, you need...Read More...
Thank you, David. appleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

Namesake

ahmad
Hello, everyone, Of a mistake arising out of similarity in name(s), can one qualify it with namesake as in the following? 1. The mistake was namesake in nature. 2. The mistake’s nature was namesake. Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Ahmad, Unfortunately, "namesake" does not work at all in those two sentences. "Namesake" is used in an entirely different way. Generally, a namesake is the name of the person in honor of whom something else is named. Thus, Betty Azar is the namesake of Azar Grammar Exchange. In your sentences, you could use "nominal" for the meaning you want. One definition of "nominal" is "of or relating to names (in distinction to things)" ( OED ): 1a. The mistake was nominal in nature. 2a. The...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Fewest or least

1- "This book has the fewest number of pages." 2- "The tour guide said that ten is the least number of tourists she can take on the boat trip." These two sentences are taken from a school book taught to 3rd year preparatory in Egypt. I think the first sentence is OK but I am confused why the second sentence contains "least" not "fewest" PS: "English Grammar Usage"Read More...
Hi, Mr P., Generally, we do not speak of " the fewest number of " or " the least number of ," just as we don't speak of " the most number of "; rather, we refer to " the smallest number of " and the " the largest number of ." Let's revise the textbook sentences: 1a) This book has the smallest number of pages . 2a) The tour guide said that ten is the smallest number of tourists she can take on the boat trip. Some people feel it is incorrect to use "least" with count nouns, that "least" should...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Day/Date

ahmad
Hello, everyone, 1. He visited his family on June 3, 2017, and died on the same day next year. 2. He visited his family on June 3, 2017, and died the same day next year. 3. He visited his family on June 3, 2017, and died the same date next year. 4. He visited his family on June 3, 2017, and died on the same date next year. Which of the above sentences are correct or preferable? Thanks. PS: Sameness on the one hand and ever passing nature of time on the other make me feel a tad uncomfortable.Read More...
Thanks, sir.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

You'd be better doing something

Hussein Hassan
Hello, there. Hope that all of you are fine. Is it grammatically right to say: You' d be better stopping smoking. I know some alternatives can be used instead, but I'm just wondering whether the phrase of "You'd be better doing something" in the context above was used correctly or not? Many thanks...Read More...
Thanks a lot, Gustavo and David for the information you've provided. Really interesting and helpful especially, the difference between "quit" and "stop". So, for this reason we say for example: "stop crying", but can't say "quit crying".Read More...
Last Reply By Hussein Hassan · First Unread Post

Question vs Questions

If it is one page examination paper, which is consists of few question, which of the following sentence is appropriate. (1) This examination paper consists of one page of question . (2) This examination paper consist of one page of questions .Read More...
Thanks Capt (Rtd) Joshua Loo On Friday, 2 August 2019, 05:04:10 pm GMT+8, The Grammar Exchange < alerts@hoop.la > wrote: Reply By David, Moderator: Question vs Questions | == To reply by email, write above this line. == | | | | | Hello, joshua: We're sending you this notification because you are either following the forum, the content, or the author listed below. New Reply To Topic | Subject: Question vs Questions Reply By: David, Moderator In: | | joshua posted: If it is one page...Read More...
Last Reply By joshua · First Unread Post

apart from

1 ) Apart from my marital life, I have a lot to be grateful for. 2 ) Apart from my marital life, there is a lot I am grateful for. According to these sentences, is my marital life something I am grateful for or not? Gratefully NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi, No, I would not say that "besides" is just as ambiguous as "apart from" there; it clearly has the "in addition to" meaning. However, unless it is supported by something like "other things" ("I have a lot of other things to be grateful for"), I do find the "besides"-phrase awkward in initial position, precisely because it seems as if the writer imagines it has the other meaning. It works better at the end, especially with the addition of a comma and "too": 1a') I have a lot to be...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Grammatical errors

Hello, "Unlike the USA, people in Canada and other counties are not allowed to use guns." I wonder which part is ungrammatical. I don't know the source of the sentence and it was a testing item from my grammar class. Does it have an error? Thanks.Read More...
Hi, Jiho, You are not comparing the countries, but their inhabitants. The countries should be referred to as the locations where different behaviors are reported, not as the elements being compared. I think the sentence could be fixed by saying: - Unlike (people) in the USA, people in Canada and other counties are not allowed to use guns. - Unlike what happens in the USA, people in Canada and other counties are not allowed to use guns.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

But

Hi everyone I want to know the role of "But" in these examples. -"Truth is but a bitter pill to swallow, but it is still the best medicine ever. " Is it equivalent to this sentence? Although truth is a bitter pill to swallow, it is still the best medicine ever. I should mention that I do not understand the role of first "But" in the sentence. The second example is here -" We should always remember that one does not loose but telling the truth, but only when he/she holds back. " is this,...Read More...
Thank you so much Because I had really been confused. The more I looked for it, the less I found it. I have taken these examples from " Sample Essays for the TOEFL ".Read More...
Last Reply By Leonard-Jones · First Unread Post

lit up by/with?

Would anyone like to chime in? The night sky was lit up with fireworks. OR The night sky was lit up by fireworks. much thanksRead More...
Hi, Perriced, Before answering your question, I'd like to make two corrections: 1. "chime in" is used when someone says something in the middle of a conversation, so it doesn't seem to be the right phrasal to start a thread. Such an invitation could be made in the middle of the thread, when there have already been some replies and you want somebody else to take part in the discussion. 2. "thanks" is plural, so you should say " many thanks." Now, in answer to your question, both sentences: a.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

"notwithstanding" & richer that portrayed

What is the meaning of "notwithstanding" and " richer that portrayed" in the sentence below? These research studies and analyses notwithstanding , the view of communication as transmission is much richer than portrayed here. Bruce, B. C., Connell, J., Higgins, C., & Mahoney, J. T. (2011). The discourse of management and the management of discourse. International Journal of Strategic Change Management .Read More...
Hi, Joshua, "These research studies and analyses notwithstanding " means the same thing as " Notwithstanding these research studies and analyses," which means the same thing as " In spite of these research studies and analyses." In "richer than portrayed here," "portrayed here" is a truncated comparative clause. The meaning is that "the view of communication as transmission is much richer than it is portrayed as being here."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

fixed income

Hi, A: How about you hire a gardener to take care of that jungle you call a lawn? B: I'm on a fixed income. What does "be on a fixed income" mean? Thanks a lot.Read More...
Hi, Kuen: "Fixed income" has an economic definition that you can easily Google. By replying "I'm on a fixed income," Speaker B means to imply that his or her income cannot be increased to accommodate the expense of hiring a gardener. Speaker B's reply is a convoluted way of saying, "I can't afford to do that."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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