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my whole life

Dear teachers, Please advise me if the following sentences are correct. (A) I never had a problem with my tummy my whole life unitl I got pregnant. (B) I never had a problem with my tummy for my whole life unitl I got pregnant.Read More...
Yun, my friend, I don't know how to make this any clearer. I'll give it one last try. When you say (for) his whole life , that means "from the time he was born up to now ," so it isn't necessary to say up to now because that is included in the idea of (for) his whole life . Whether or not you use the preposition for is irrelevant. This is called a redundancy. It's like saying I'm sick, and I don't feel well. Do you see how ridiculous that sentence is? Of course if you're sick, you don't feel...Read More...

sad

Hi!! when you refer to things,can we say 'I'm sad with it' or only about it? Thanks!!Read More...
You can say I'm sad about it or I'm sad over it , but not I'm sad with it.Read More...

verbally

Hi!! Once again, I would like to know if this sentence is correct 'this sentence is verbally correct' Thanks!Read More...
Since I'm not sure what it means, I'll have to say it's not correct. Are you talking about the vocabulary used in the sentence? Are you talking about whether or not the vocabulary used is appropriate? If that's the case, perhaps it would be clearer if you said This sentence is lexically correct. Actually, though, the sentence is awkward any way you look at it. It would be simpler and clearer to make the subject of the sentence not the sentence itself, but the element of the sentence that...Read More...

Ending

The story doesn't end in happy ending. Am I correctly using 'ending'? Thank youRead More...
The sentence should be The story doesn't have a happy ending.Read More...

Possessing

The woman got arrested for possessing drugs. Am I correctly using 'possessing'? Thank youRead More...
Yes, Welkins. That's fine.Read More...

Verbs that take the 'were'-subjunctive

(Reposted from old newsgroup on 2/13/03) Is there a list of verbs which take the "were" form (I used to call it the subjunctive when I first learned grammar so long ago)instead of the "was"? Lisa Blauvelt-WeilRead More...
Hi I hope you can get more here through this link too http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subjunctive_moodRead More...

I still don't believe that the minister

I still don't believe that the minister knew what was happening; I am sure ...... A) couldn't have B) can C) shouldn't have D) hasn't to E) hadn't Could you explain me why A? Actually I didn't get this question.Read More...
A is the correct answer here, Volcano. The sentence is in the past ("... the minister knew what was happening") and therefore we need to choose the idea that "it wasn't possible that he knew / for him to know." We use the perfect modal for ideas in the past, so that's why the answer is he couldn't have (known) . If we want to say "I'm sure it wasn't possible that he knew" or "I'm sure it wasn't possible for him to know," we say I'm sure he couldn't have (known).Read More...

name mentioned

Hi, Which sentennce is correct officially? The name mentioned above or The mentioned name above MahdiRead More...
I did so as it contains the name mentioned above where it is the point of discussion. Any way, I will post in a new thread as you requested.Read More...

Pavement = road?

Hi, I have read that the word "pavement" in AmE means "road" in BrE. Is this information correct?Read More...
Please notice that I said MOST, not all .Read More...

have

Girl : Hey, Tommy. Are you ready to plan the play for the school festival? Boy : Totally, and...well... I was thinking about doing something with singing in it. Girl : Singing? Boy : Just hear me out. It would be a comedy about a school that uses singing to punish bad students. Girl : They have to sing a songs? Boy : No, not at all. They have to listen to someone sing a song in the most awful way. Girl: Sounds pretty cool. How would the play go? Boy : Well, we would have the initial scene in...Read More...
Hello, Jay: This sentence would be fine, but it means something a little different from 'have the scene....' Start the scene means to begin the scene only. The scene would not take place entirely in the class. Have the scene indicates that the entire scene would take place in the class.Read More...

where

In today's news there is new diet for some Australian Crocs: the fish known as 'mullet'. Each year the mullet make there way up stream, during high tide, in the Mary River where they go to breed. Is it okay to omit where in the sentence? And is there a typo?Read More...
Yes, it should have a comma.Read More...

country - count

Hi, I am cofused between the pronounciation of these words. country and count they have same letters cou MahdiRead More...
Thanks Richarad MahdiRead More...

a quarter (a coin), one or it

If you have a quarter, could you lend (it/one) to me? In the sentence above, which is correct, one or it? AppleRead More...
You need to use it , Apple. The reason is that you're talking about a specific quarter, so you need it , which represents a specific thing both the speaker and know about. If the speaker says, "If you have any quarters, could you lend me ___?" then we'd use one in the blank because one doesn't stand for a specific thing, just the singular of whatever you're talking about.Read More...

howjsay?

Hi, I have found the link below and I wonder what the j stand for or means. http://www.howjsay.com/ PS. I tried to contact those responsible for the site but I found no contact details.Read More...
Very interesting! Thanks a lot, Richard.Read More...

must / have to

Which the correct sentence and why? 1- you must bring some identification when you open a bank account. 2- you have to bring some identification when you open a bank account.Read More...
Thank you Rachel and Richard for taking all this time for clarifying this topic. HumamRead More...

Is the sentence correct?

Hi, Is the sentence below grammatically correct? If there are any changes to be done to it, please do. "In my opinion a degree remains the indispensable key to finding a good job".Read More...
I Thank you all Richard and Izzy about my question. MahdiRead More...

necessarily

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "Language is not necessarily the private property of those who uses it." Can I place "necessarily" either at the beginning of the sentence or at the end of it? Is "necessarily" an adverb? Does it modify the whole sentence? Thanks.Read More...
No, my friend. It's placement is normally after the negative adverb just as it appears in your example sentence. And yes, necessarily is an adverb. In this sentence, not modifies necessarily and necessarily modifies is . Whew!Read More...

other?

Which is correct please? to use the number before (other) or after it? - ... and wounded thirteen other soldiers. -.... and wounded other thirteen soldiers. - ... and wounded the other two soldiers. - ... and wounded the two other soldiers.Read More...
And I have never had such a satisfactory answer to the very question! Thanks a million RichardRead More...

a storm

John: It's very sunny in San Jose now, right? - To answer this question, can I say like these? "No, a storm is going around here" "No, a level-eight storm is happening here" Thanks very much to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
No, these sentences aren't natural. How about: No, a category 5 hurricane is going on! No, there's a big storm going on now.Read More...

She was taped around her thigh.

Although I have lost the source, I have recently come across the sentence below in the sports section of a newspaper. (1)She ( a tennis player) was taped around her thigh. I understand the intended meaning, but doesn’t it have to be written like (2)? (2)She had her thigh taped around. Or has sentence (1) become acceptable? AppleRead More...
The original sentence is correct, Apple. 'Was taped' is a passive verb. The phrase could also be 'was bandaged.' Grammatically, it is like 'was burned,' 'was bruised,' or 'was sensitized' around her thigh. Someone -- or perhaps she, herself -- taped her (around) the thigh. So, her thigh was taped, or, she was taped around the thigh. The thigh had been taped and the resulting state of the thigh is taped. It might be possible to express another idea like your second sentence too. But it would...Read More...

That Of

This special treatment stemmed from the perception of sport as that of a special activity with modest economic effects. What is the function of that of in this sentence?Read More...
In re-reading this sentence, I think it would be better to omit 'that of' entirely: This special treatment stemmed from the perception of sport as a special activity with modest economic effects. This would be the most direct.Read More...

whom

Here is a list of the dealers whom you may use when ordering various kinds of supplies and equipment. Why is the speaker saying 'whom' instead of 'which' or 'that'? I think it should be 'which' or 'that' because 'a list of the dealers' is a thing, not people.Read More...
Thank you both.Read More...
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