All Forum Topics

thinking

Woman : I really just want to work out now and then and maybe have a swim. What's included in the basic membership? Man : Basic membership allows use of all facilities. The main restriction is time. Evenings after 7:00 and all day Saturday is for Premium members only. Women : That's not a problem for me. I'd only be coming on lunch breaks from my office just around the corner. Men : Then Basic would be ideal. Is it okay to say the bold sentence in this way: I was only thinking of coming on...Read More...
It's okay to say that, my friend, but not as an accurate paraphrase of the original sentence. Your sentence has changed the meaning. The original sentence ( I'd only be coming ) means something like "this is the routine I expect to have when I come to the gym."Read More...

where

Friday night when they got home, Natalie and her mom went right out again and ate at a Chinese restaurant and then caught a late movie at the local theater-one of those British movies where half the actors wear fancy clothes and the other half look like beggars. What does where indicate in the sentence? And Could I say in which instead of where like this: ...and then caught a late movie at the local theater-one of those British movies in which half the actors wear fancy clothes and the other...Read More...
Where means "in which," Jey, just as you've used that phrase in your alternate sentence! Actually, I think in which works better in this context than where .Read More...

any

Which are correct: 1-If any one of them can do it, it is John. 2-If any of them can do it, it is John . (Meaning: If there is anybody among them that can do it, that person is John.) 3-If any of them can do it, it is John and Harry. (Meaning: If there are any people among them that that can do it, those people are John and Harry.) It seems to me that '2' is not correct.Read More...
2 works as well as the others, Navi. The only difference between 1 and 2 is that some people may consider 1 more emphatic because of the use of one , but there's not really any difference other than that.Read More...

either II

Are these sentences correct (In all cases: 'them'= John + someone else): 1-If either of them has done it, it is John. 2-If either of them can do it, it is John. 3-If either of them can do it, it should be John. (If one of the two can do it, that one should logically be John and not the other one.) 4-If any of them can do it, it is John. (Them=John + someone else)Read More...
1, 2, and 3 work fine, my friend. 4 doesn't work with any . When you say any of them , you're referring to three or more, not just two.Read More...

either I

Is this sentence correct: 1-If either of them can't do it, we are in trouble. Meaning: if one of them can't do it, we are in trouble. If both of them can do it, then there is no problem.Read More...
First off, I don't feel comfortable responding to something I don't think is natural or native-like. The normal way of saying this would be If neither of them can do it, we're in trouble. The meaning, whether in your unusual phrasing or in my more natural phrasing, is that at least one of them has to be able to do it, or we're in trouble.Read More...

she or he

Hi, How can I call male who is shemale he or she?Read More...
hi, if shemale has a boy's name you could call he, if reverse you could call she...thats my opinion..of course in the event that there is no special names for them.Read More...

except

Which are correct: 1-Your husband is just like the sun, without the heat! 2-Your husband is just like the sun, except, without the heat! 3-Your husband is just like the sun, except for the heat! 3-Your husband is just like the sun, except for the coldness! These sentences are supposed to be humourous. They seem at first to praise the husband, but then make fun of him and criticize him by saying that in fact, he is cold.Read More...
Okay, my friend, here's my take on these, which is somewhat different: 1-grammatical 2-grammatical; doesn't require the second comma 3-grammatical 4-grammatical; not logical; logical by saying except for his coldness! , which Rachel has pointed out These are examples of what we call biting humor . At face value, the sentences seem humorous, but there's an underlying message which can be interpreted as negative criticism of the man.Read More...

Some legal authorities

Some legal authorities -- that a n innovative solution for the autonomous regions -- as soon as possible. A) demanded / would find B) demand / be found C) have demanded / to be found D) had demanded / would have been found E) could have demanded / were found They key is B, why not C?Read More...
Hello, Volcano: To add to Richard's insightful remarks: We have had several discussions about verb complementation on the Grammar Exchange. Here's one, covering 'demand' and some other verbs. The link at the bottom is important and has a simple useful chart: http://thegrammarexchange.info...=720101551#720101551Read More...

to omit the same subject in two sentences

Dear teacher, Please see the following sentence. Is it a bad sentence because the same subject is repeated in the second clause? When we read, we first form innumerable impressions, then we evaluate those impressions as we read on.Read More...
The use of the subject is fine, Yun. What isn't fine is the way the sentence is punctuated. Instead of a comma, a semi-colon should be used if you want to keep this one sentence: When we read, we first form innumerable impressions ; then we evaluate those impressions as we read on. Or we can make two sentences: When we read, we first form innumerable impressions . T hen we evaluate those impressions as we read on.Read More...

blame for

Can one use: 1-I blamed him for not getting a promotion. instead of: 2-I blamed him for my not getting a promotion. To me 1 can only mean: I blamed him for his not getting a promotion.Read More...
Sentence 1 is ambiguous. It can mean either that the speaker himself did not get the promotion, or that the listener or even someone else did not get the promotion. Sentence 2 is clear. Any possessive modifying the gerund clarifies the sentenfce.Read More...

one/none

Can one say: 1-I had plans but one of them wasn't living with you. instead of: a-I had plans but non of them was living with you.Read More...
Nope, that doesn't make sense, Navi. 1a works, although you should correct the misspelling of non e .Read More...

could use

Man : I finally got Tim asleep. So, I guess we finally get some quiet time. Woman : I really could use a nice relaxing soak in the tub. Looking after Time all day long just wears me out. Why is the woman using 'could use' instead of 'need' or 'want'? What is the difference among 'could use', 'need' and 'want'? Thanks a lot in advance.Read More...
That's a great question, my friend! When I say I want ... or I need ... , the listener imagines that I am stating a relatively strong desire or fact, and he assumes that I am going to do whatever it is. When I say I could use ... , I'm communicating that this is something I would like, but it's not a very strong statement, so it shows that I may not actually do whatever it is, or it may just my way of communicating how I'm feeling at that moment. When the woman says, "I really could use a...Read More...

Accents/Dialects

Dear all, I read in a book about accents and dialects. It says " an accent is the sound of one language imposed on another... Dialects differ from accents in that they represent regional and cultural differences within the same language. What people call a Southern accent is really a Southern dialect." (Working in Groups, Engleberg and Wynn, Peasron) However, according to Cambridge Dictionary, accent is the way in which people in a particular area, country or social group pronounce words and...Read More...
Here's a little tip for you on a cultural note, Tony: In many cultures -- including my own -- a person can smile warmly as he tells you something in a very sweet way and be dripping with sarcasm, as we say, which is a form of being rude. Of course, I didn't see them so I don't know for sure, but keep this in mind as a mini-lesson in cultural awareness.Read More...

I have witnessed at close range the problems scientists

I have witnessed at close range the problems scientists ....... when they ....... to examine phenomena as elusive as language and idea formation. A) were encountering / were trying B) are encountering / have tried C) have encountered / were tried D) encounter / try E) will encounter / are going to try I thought A, but the key is B, could you explain me?Read More...
I think that B is not correct because 'have tried' implies that they're not going to continue to try. A and D are correct. They both show the same tense: I encounter/ they encounter and I am encountering / they are encountering. C can't be correct because the second verb is passive, and E can't be correct because the second verb, a time clause, should have the present tense form, not a future tense.Read More...

certainly! absolutely! exactly!

Hello, 1. A. I think it was so stupid of Kenye West to destroy Taylor Shift's acceptance speech. B. Absolutely! 2. A. He was out of his mind. B. Exactly! 3.A. It was so wrong of him to do such thing. B. Certainly! Are all these interjections? Thank you!^^Read More...
In a way, that's correct, Iwtk. These words are being used here as interjections. But actually, they are advebs as used here, each one modifying the complete sentences.Read More...

past continuous

Boy: We went to the lake after the temple, but we just walked around the lake. And later on I wanted to check out the amusement park, but instead we went to the museum. Girl : Sounds like it wasn't the great time you were expecting . Is it okay to say you expected instead of you were expecting ? If so, why is the speaker saying 'you were expecting' not, 'you expected'?Read More...
Re: past continuousRead More...

on the way to work

1-My brother gave this to me on the way to work. Is sentence "1" ambiguous? Can't it mean either: a-My brother gave this to me on his way to work. or: b-My brother gave this to me on my way to work.Read More...
Or it could even mean while both of them were going to work. But in normal parlance, the listener will assume that it means while the brother was on his way to work.Read More...

be going to be going to

Dear teachers, The following sentence apprears strange to me but I can see many examples of the same structure on the web. I am going to be going to China. We are not going to be going to trial the 17th of September. I think the first "be going to" means the future. But how about the second "be going to?" I don't know the exact meaning or role in the sentences. What is the reason they say that way instead of "I am going to China"?Read More...
You mean "... and it should be ..." Yun. And yes, I agree with you. That might be a typo (somebody forgetting to delete something that was changed) or just somebody using the language incorrectly. Whichever the case is, your correction is right.Read More...

The words may hardly have left our lips before we secretly wish

I'd appreciate it if someone would answer my question. Thanks in advance. Is the following sentence (the second one) correct? "We are liable to say something rather amusing but perhaps unkind and our words leave a sting. The words may hardly have left our lips before we secretly wish we had not spoken in that way." I suppose "may have hardly left" should be replaced by "hardly leave" or "have hardly left".Read More...
Thank you very much, Richard.Read More...

'who is..?' or 'who are..?

Hi !! Is this question correct? "who are more attractive, blonds or brunettes?" or should we ask: "who is more attractive, blonds or brunettes? Thanks!!Read More...
I`d say `who are` as the answer would be either blonds are or brunettes are but that is just a non-native English teacher`s oppinion.Read More...

inversion

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please help me invert this sentence. "There has been standing a high building in the centre of the city. => In the centre of the city ... My try: => In the centre of the city has been standing a high building. Thanks.Read More...
Your try is in a word order that's considered a poetic style, my friend. In more conversational or even formal English, we'd say In the centre of the city a tall building has been standing. Notice that I chose tall , not high . We normally use tall to indicate the height of something that starts from the ground and goes up, e.g., trees, buildings, ladders, people, etc. Two exceptions are when we describe mountains and free-standing walls. For those two things, we use high .Read More...

has got to

Zoe and Natalie were in gym class on Friday afternoon. Zoe said, "So, when I call your mom today, she 's got to say it's okay for me to send her the manuscript, and then when she gets it, she 's got to want to read it." Does has got to means has to ? Thank you in advance.Read More...
Yes, my friend, have got to means the same thing as have to .Read More...

otherwise

Are these sentences correct: 1-He allowed the workers to leave because he feared unrest otherwise. 2-He allowed the workers to leave because he feared unrest if he didn't. 3-The workers left with his permission for he feared unrest otherwise. 4-The workers left with his permission for he feared unrest if they didn't. Do 1 and 2 mean exactly the same? Do 3 and 4 mean exactly the same?Read More...
Yes, for me 1 and 2 mean the same thing. I don't like the construction of 3 and 4 at all, Navi, because you've switched subjects "in mid-stream," as we say. The sentences start with the workers as the subjects, but then you suddenly introduce him, the boss, as the subject. It's very awkward and hard to deal with. Do 3 and 4 mean the same thing? Yes, they do, but I really don't like these sentences. And, by the way, that use of for meaning "because" is super-formal and considered archaic by...Read More...

Perfect Gerund

1)The commission was accused of_______ with political matters in accordance with the survey. B) having interfered (key) 2)The boy was dismissed for ___ to work on time. C)not having come E)not coming (key) If the first answer is perfect gerund, why is the second present?Read More...
Thanks Rachel I am still having problem with perfect gerund and infinitive.I couldn't build its usage in my mind somehow.When I say I have learned it I come across a sentence which I don't get, then all upside down lol.Read More...
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