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adverbials

Are these sentences correct: 1-They kidnapped her with her golden bracelet on. 2-They kidnapped her , with her golden bracelet on. (MEANING: They kidnapped her and she had her golden bracelet on when they did it.) 3-They kidnapped her with her sister. 4-They kidnapped her, with her sister. (MEANING: They kidnapped her and her sister.)Read More...
Sentences 1 and 2 are both OK. Sentences 3 and 4 would be better as this: They kidnapped her, along with her sister. OR They kidnapped her and her sister. (Your original sentence 3)Read More...

date

What is the common way to say a date? Is there any difference between "June nineteenth", "nineteenth of June" and "the nineteenth of June"? In written English, do we need to write "the" in front of "19th of June" and "19th June"? In a resignation letter, is it nec on essary for us to put "on" after "My last day will be"? For example, "My last day will be on June 19".Read More...
Either way is fine. There are several ways to say and write dates. Both 'June nineteenth' and 'June the nineteenth' are correct.Read More...

Hard and difficult

Dear Richard & Rachel I received a question from someone else asking about the difference between " play hard " and " play difficult "?. I think the first is correct. It is as we say for example " study hard". The writer of the question translate " play hard " as " It's hard/ difficult to play ". But it doesn't really mean so? What do you think? and what I should tell her about the difference? I'm waiting for your kind reply. Thank you very much. SayedRead More...
If you are inclined to like grammatical categories, this might help: With 'play hard,' 'hard' is an adverb. It modifies 'play' and means to play with a lot of energy, as Richard explains. 'Difficult' can not substitute for 'hard. When you say something is 'difficult,' as in 'The game is difficult to play,' 'difficult' is an adjective, modifying 'game.' In this case, you can substitute 'hard' because when 'hard' is an adjective, it means 'difficult.' When you say, 'It is difficult,'...Read More...

should have

Dear teachers, Would you tell me the exact meaning of the following sentence? It was only natural that he should have been a candidate. Does it mean that he became a candidate or it was not certain that he became a candidate but people believed so?Read More...
I think the sentence is ambiguous. If it was natural for him to be a candidate, the sentence would be clearer as this: It was only natural that he should be a candidate. OR It was only natural that he be a candidate. OR It was only natural for him to be a candidate. If you wish to express that he did not become a candidate, it would be clear to say: It was only natural for him not to be a candidate.Read More...

run someone off his feet

Dear experts, Many thanks for all your previous comments. Now, how would you define the meaning of RUN SOMEONE OFF HIS FEET as in: Nobody talked about the man who, at the age of 51, RAN ME OFF MY FEET in a cross-country run. That’s the man whom I want to remember… Thank you, YuriRead More...
That idiomatic expression means that the man was much faster than the narrator, more than likely a much younger man. The narrator is letting you know how surprised he was at the energy and stamina exhibited by the older man. You can use this expression for any situation in which one person does something faster and more energetically than another person, so don't think it's limited to running.Read More...

follow-up to REGRET +

Dear experts, Thank you for your comments and the interest in the problem of discriminating between REGERET + GERUNG versus INFINITIVE. It may also be of interest to consider the following discussion: http://forum.wordreference.com...wthread.php?t=552889 Greetings, YuriRead More...

in bed vs. to bed?

Hi, If the second sentence is correct, I wonder what there difference is between 1 and 2. 1. She put her child to bed. 2. She put her child in bed.Read More...
Basically what Richard said. Putting the kids to bed can include all the preparations beforehand -- changing diapers or having them go to the toilet, putting PJs on, brushing teeth, reading stories, etc. So depending on the age(s) of the kid(s), putting the kid(s) to bed can be quite a big task! You could also refer to all the preparations as getting them ready for bed .Read More...

recent

The book puts "recent" in this way "This recent stormy wet weather." Is this "demonstrator" O.K. before all recent"??? stormy "general description" wet "noun adjunct" am I right?Read More...
There's a normal 'order of adjectives.' Maybe this discussion, with explanation by Richard, will help you: http://thegrammarexchange.info...?r=37710842#37710842Read More...

adjective

in page 118 0f Marcella says first we put triple then "the" But in exercise we have even the triple I think "the" is article and should be after multipliers (the book says like this)Read More...
Elham, I still can't get it. The word 'triple' is not a determiner. And, although I happen to have a copy of Marcella Frank's Modern English, it must be a different edition because page 118 doesn't have this topic.Read More...

adjective 2

"steep" and "muddy" are general description, which one we should put first a muddy steep river bank? a steep muddy river bank?Read More...
No, 'Muddy' is a material, so it goes closer to the noun. Haven't you seen Richard's good description of the order of adjectives? Richard, would you mind posting that here for Elham?Read More...

Inherirtance

His ideologies is cultural inheritance to the country because it has great impact on the people. Am I correctly using 'inheritance'?Read More...
Yes, Welkins, 'inheritance' is OK here. But say either 'ideology is' or 'ideologies are' for subject-verb agreement.Read More...

's

Will it be awkward to say "...seek David's mom's help on the project"? Is it grammatically correct to use two apostrophe s's in a row?Read More...
Thank you very much, everyone!Read More...

past progressive

1. My new student was not familiar with the novel we were reading in class. 2. My new student was not familiar with the novel we read in class. I think I can understand the difference between the two sentences gramatically, thanks to Ricahrd's explaination before. My understanding is that the past progressive of no.1 is to show that they had been reading the novel for a length of time until the new student joined their class and learned the novel together. I'm not sure my understanding is...Read More...
This sentence would not make sense. There is something you might change to make it OK. You could say the newspaper, magazine, or even Bible that we read once a week. Maybe the class uses a newspaper or magazine once a week, or maybe it's a religion class and the reading material is the Bible or the Koran or the Torah. The students might read these works regularly to guide them. But I don't think a novel would be read once a week. In installments perhaps? That would be unlikely, but possible.Read More...

did not definitely

Can one say: 1-He did not certainly speak to the minister. meaning: 2-It is not certain that he spoke to the minister. Can one say: 3-He did not definitely speak to the minister. meaning: 4-It is not definite that he spoke to the minister.Read More...
No, Navi, the red sentences are not native and they are not clear in meaning. Your purple sentences are better. You can put the adverbs inside the sentence this say, but it changes the meaning: He certainly did not talk to the minister. He definitely did not talk to the minister. In these cases, you are emphasizing the negativity of the verbs, not expressing the uncertainty of the situation.Read More...

Have a big dinner for

- Christmas is my father's birthday so instead of celebrating it on Christmas we do it the day before. So on Christmas Eve we're usually having a big dinner for him. - I think it should be "on Christmas day" and "we usually prepare a big dinner for him" are much better in this context,right? Thanks a lot to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
Saying on Christmas is the same thing as saying on Christmas Day , Nammy. The other sentence needs to be tweaked, though: So, on Christmas Eve we usually have a big dinner for him.Read More...

any - so many

The impression I got was that the director had completely given up ---- hopes he may at one time have cherished. A) any B) so many Are both correct? Thanks.Read More...
"So many' works too! 'Any' is correct and means, as you know, any one at all. 'So many' means that there were many, many hopes and he gave up on most of them.Read More...

worth

The movie is good. It is worth watching it in theather. Am I correctly using 'worth'? Thank youRead More...
'Theater' is not one of those expressions with a singular count noun that omits the article. With 'theater,' we say 'the theater' or 'a theater.Read More...

go home?

Hi, I wonder why we don't need a preposition before "home" as in: go home stay (at) home But we need it with "go" with other words as in: go to the market.Read More...
Thanks a lot, Richard and Rachel.Read More...

should

Matt : I was just about to go pick up a lottery ticket. Jenny : Really? Are you feeling lucky today? Matt : Well, my horoscope in the newspaper says that I should look forward to an unexpected surprise. I'm hoping to get lucky. What does should mean in the sentence? Could you tell me which number in LDOCE is explaining about should in the sentence? http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/shouldRead More...
Six of one, half-dozen of the other.Read More...

Which words?

Hi all GE members, I am looking for two words that describe: 1/ the act of composing a song from a poem. (Use the verses of a poem for the lyrics of a song). 2/ the act of imitating the melody of a song but without the original lyrics for other purposes (for fun...). Many thanks,Read More...
That's an interesting part of language, isn't it? It is right there in the dictionary but rarely heard or used by native speakers. I think it is the same thing in any language including mine. And that's why we all need experts like you and Rachel . Thanks again Richard.Read More...

Registered

I had not registered the joke as they did. Am I correctly using 'registered'? Thank youRead More...
If you register something, you realize it and then remember it (LDOCE). You register someone's face, for example, when you don't first recognize them and then you remember their name. I would probably say I did not get the joke as they did. or I did not recognize the joke as they did. I wouldn't use the past perfect with "I" and the simple past with "they" (as you did) unless the context made that logical. And then I would say as they had .Read More...

wage

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Is it correct to use either a noun phrase or a gerund in the case? "People have rioted on the street as result of cutting wages." "People have rioted on the street as result of wage cuts." ThanksRead More...
Yes, gerunds can come after prepositions, and I can think of other sentences where as a result of can be followed by a gerund. But this here doesn't sound right to me. I always hear wage cuts . It might be because cutting wages could at first be interpreted (wrongly) as a participle modifying wages (something like rising prices ) ... or because I want to (again wrongly) interpret it as the people are the ones who are cutting the wages, which of course, is not logical. ... as a result of the...Read More...

though

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Is it correct to place "though" at the end of the sentence? "The surroundings were depressing, the meal was excellent, though." Thanks.Read More...
Yes, it's OK. It's an adverb here. This is what LDOCE says: though .Read More...
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