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Is make or break

The occasion is, by definition, make or break. Can 'is make or break' use together? Thank youiRead More...
Hello, Welkins: 'Make or break' is an expression. Here's the definition from the American Heritage Dictionary: Resulting in great success or utter failure: a make-or-break investment plan. In other words, the action is very risky. It will either be a big success OR will ruin the investment plan.Read More...

Get myself across

- I'm wondering if I'm out of line with my continued enthusiasm about her. I try to move on but cannot shake her. I speak to my friends about her and they assure me that I'm clearly in love with her. I wish I know a way to get myself across, but can't seem to find the right way to accomplish this! - What do "I'm out of line with my continued enthusiasm" and "to get myself across" mean in this context? Thanks a lot to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
Hello, Namcoolguy: I'm out of line = I am excessive, I am acting inappropriately. with my continued enthusiasm = I continue to be crazy about her. To get myself across = to express my wants and desires in a way that is not only acceptable, but effective. So the sentences together mean that the speaker is acting inappropriately by being so super-enthusiastic about the girl (it's probably bothersome to her), and he wishes he could communicate his love for her in a way that she would accept him.Read More...

tense

Would you please advise me with the suitable tense for the following sentence and say Why: - She (read) a lot before she goes to the university in September. Thank youRead More...
This sentence is possible if it's her habit to do the reading every year, probably over the summer, before she goes to the university in September. As Richard has pointed out, the 'in September' part does not influence the main verb in this sentence.Read More...

wait on

Dear experts, Will it be possible to use WAIT ON instead of WAIT FOR in the following sentences: While WAITING ON his brother to return home, he killed some time by walking through a graveyard, looking at the names. I walked back and told him I’d tell him where to stop for the bus (which was already WAITING ON him). She stopped as she reached the top and turned to WAIT ON the slower paced horse. Thank you, YuriRead More...
I think so, Okaasan. I feel that the use of 'wait on' is spreading. Although I myself haven't used it, I hear it a lot around me, more than I used to, it seems.Read More...

truly/duly

Hi, are truly and duly adjective, tooRead More...
When a word modifies an adjective, it's an adverb, so truly is an adverb because it's modifying the adjective happy . Another way to tell it's an adverb is that the vast majority of adverbs end in -ly . The adjective is true , the adverb is truly .Read More...

On occasion

- I have spoken with her on occasion, sent emails, and cards. I have expressed my deepest apologies for my ill behavior and have told her I was willing to do anything to amend my wrongs. I get so many mixed signals from her! I've told her flat out that it might be best that we part ways so she can find a man that she truly loves who can treat her right, but then she says that's not what she wants to do. - What do "on occasion" and "part ways" mean here? Thanks so much to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
on occasion: occasionally, from time to time, once in awhile part ways: separate, go in different directionsRead More...

to infinitive and perfect infinitive

cocoricot
Dear teachers, I am confusing about using simple infintive (to infinitive) and perfect infinitive (to have + past participle)when rewriting the sentence: "We expected that the report will be published shortly." I was made to rewrite this sentence beginning with "The report ..." I think it will be done like that: "The report was expected to be published shortly" I wonder when it would be: "The report was expected to have been published shortly." Thank you very much.Read More...
Thank you, Coco! Happy holidays and a very happy new year to you!Read More...
Last Reply By Richard, Moderator (Guest) · First Unread Post

"an attached file" vs. "attached a file"

"Please find attached a file." This sentence sounds awkard to me because of word order. I think "Please find an attached file." is correct. "articel + adjective + noun" is correct order, isn't it? But my Australian friend says "Please find attached a file." is correct. (1) Both of the sentences are correct? (2) How can you expalin "Please find attached a file."?Read More...
Thank you very much.Read More...

used for used to

engfan
A pen is used to write. A pen is used for writing. what is it used for? what is it used to? Is the last question correct? please helpRead More...
As Okaasan says, we'd never ask the question What is this used to ? That question will always use for . Here's a link to a former posting that might help if you need to understand more about the distinction between to/in order to and for , Engfan: http://thegrammarexchange.info...=313104952#313104952Read More...

drinks

When we order drinks, will it be more natural and common to say "three coffees, two teas and two hot waters" than "three cups of coffee, two cups of tea and two glasses of hot water"?Read More...
Yes, it is really much more natural in restaurants -- high-end ones as well as fast-food ones -- to ask for coffees, teas, milks, etc. It is perfectly correct in this situation.Read More...

be in the present continuous

engfan
hi can i use be in the present continuous? i have read a sentence in the novel (spiders).Read More...
Yes, you can use 'be' in a progressive (continuous) form, like this: Tommy is usually a polite child, but today he is being rude and unkind. The children are being very good these days. They want Santa Claus to notice their good behavior. Why are you being so cruel, Carl? You are so nice! The Smiths were being quite secretive about their plans to sell their house until they actually put a 'For Sale' sign on their front lawn. Now they keep talking about their wonderful house, hoping that...Read More...

"The Great and Good (People)"?

Books introduce us into the best society they bring us into the presence of the greatest minds that have ever lived. We hear what they said and did; we see them as if they were really alive; we sympathize with them, enjoy with them, grieve with them; their experience becomes ours, and we feel as if we were in a measure actors with them in the scenes which they describe. The great and good do not die even in this world. Embalmed in books, their spirits walk abroad. The book is a living voice.Read More...
Perhaps you can keep the ambiguity in the translation?Read More...

careful and think

engfan
hi, careful of careful with careful about.......when do we use them? think of think about what is the difference?Read More...

Advertised vs Advertising

The following sentence is available in AAF (www.AAF.org): Advertising shall not offer products or services for sale unless such offer constitutes a bona fide effort to sell the advertising products or services and is not a device to switch consumers to other goods or services, usually higher priced. - Quoted from http://www.aaf.org/default.asp?id=37 Why advertising? Why not advertised?Read More...
I think that's a typo, Chuncan, or some editing had been done without proofreading the results before publishing this part. It should be advertised . Good catch!Read More...

world

Hi, again!! Guys, do you say 'all the world speaks English'?? Thanks!Read More...
If you mean, do we use the phrase all the world , the answer is yes. I immediately recall a very famous sentence by Shakespeare: "All the world's a stage." As far as the whole idea in your sentence, Hannah, well, of course that's not true.Read More...

wash

Hi!! Is it OK to say 'I think to wash the dishes is a thing for a woman', or should we say 'is something for women' ? Thank !!Read More...
Although I understand your idea, Hannah, it doesn't sound natural, the way a native speaker might say this. Here's how we can make it more natural: I think washing dishes is woman's work . I'm using a gerund noun phrase, washing dishes , which is more natural in this context than an infinitive verb phrase. When we give a name to an action, we like to use gerund noun phrases, Hannah. We have these two pat phrases, man's work / woman's work that are used by people who still think in a sexist...Read More...

time

Hi, there!! Guys, it possible to say 'I always stay a kot of time watching TV' or should we say 'spend a long time watching TV'? Thanks!!Read More...
Hello, Hannah: The sentence you want is this: I spend a lot of time watching TV. 'Spend time doing something' is a common way to express an activity that engages you very often and takes up a lot of time.Read More...

Enterprising

1. Owen is a very decisive man. He's also enterprising. 2. Owen is a very decisive man. He's also of a venturesome spirit. - Can I use these 2 sentences to mean the same meaning? And do they sound natural? Thanks a lot to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
- Dear Richard and Rachel! - What I mean by the 2 sentences is "Owen is the person who dares think and dares do anything. So what's the natural way to say? Thanks a lot! NamcoolguyRead More...

come it over

Dear experts, Could you comment on the phrase COME IT OVER SOMEONE as in: I can see through your game, I see you want to COME IT OVER me with your honeyed words. Thank you, YuriRead More...
I had never heard or seen this expression until a few minutes ago, when I read your posting, Yuri. I could not find it in any of my idioms or phrasal verbs dictionaries, nor on online dictionaries except here: http://onlinedictionary.datase...word/to+come+to+pass To come it over, to hoodwink; to get the advantage of. [Colloq.] Is this an expression you know, or have heard used?Read More...

I wish I can vs. I wish I could

(1) I wish I can say life is like a walk in the park. (2) I wish I could say life is like a walk in the park. How are (1) and (2) different in meaning?Read More...
Sentence (1) is not correct. 'Wish' introduces a hypothetical situation, so we use a conditional construction. If there is possibility for life to be like a walk in the park, use hope instead of 'wish': I hope I can say (maybe one day in the future) that life is like a walk in the park If what you are expressing is a kind of fantasy, something that isn't true and probably won't be true, use wish with a present unreal construction: I wish I could say (but I can't) that life is like a walk in...Read More...

would

I think the government needs to increase child support and improve conditions for working mothers. Women who have children need assurance that they would not be disadvantaged in their careers. I wonder why the speaker is using the verb "would". Is "would" used for a hypothetical situation? If so, what is the hypothetical situation? And if I use the verb "will" not "would", is the sentence wrong? Women who have children need assurance that they won't be disadvantaged in their careers. Thanks...Read More...
I agree that 'won't' could be used. This would make the result much more certain. With 'would' here, the writer has a conditional situation in his mind; that's why he uses 'would.' What he means is this: Women who have children need assurance that they would not be disadvantaged in their careers if they had children/ if the government gave them assurance/ if the government increased child support and improved conditions for working mothers.Read More...

understand

Hi!! Is it OK to say 'I understood something of the play', or should we say 'about the play'? Thanks!Read More...
Hi, Hannah! Yes, you can use 'something of' to mean 'something about.' It emphasizes that you understood only a part, probably a little part, of the play. I think 'understand something of' is much less frequent than 'understand something about,' and it is also more formal and literary.Read More...

to be

Hi!! When you say 'when you don't win, all you have to do is try again', or should we say is 'to try again'? Thank yoy!Read More...
Both ways are fine, Hanna: with the 'to' or without the 'to.' You can use the full infinitive (to try) or the bare infinitive (try) with this kind of cleft sentence starting with 'all,' (like those starting with 'what.') Swan* has some examples in different sections of his book. Here are a few: What he did was (to) to scream. What she does is (to) writ science fiction. All I did was (to) touch the window, and it broke. _______ *Practical English Usage, Third Edition, by Michael Swan. Oxford 2005Read More...
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