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such a great liar

cocoricot
Dear teachers, I am trying to invert the sentence into two different sentences. Please tell me if they are both correct. "He was such a great liar that nobody believed him" 1. Such a great liar was he that nobody believed him. 2. Such was a great liar that nobody believed him. Thanks.Read More...
No. 1 works fine, Coco, but please understand that it's in a very literary style. Nobody would actually speak like that. No. 2 doesn't work, at least not with such . You could say So great a liar was he that nobody believed him.Read More...

say and believe?

Hi, Does the part in bold mean that those linguists say something and believe it without any further investigation or study?Read More...
Oh! Sorry, Rachel. I thought that this phrase put between two commas can be omitted. Now, I see the point. Thanks a lot.Read More...

Indirect alternatives??

- A man asked for the way to the station. Can we consider this as a correct indirect version for : Man : "Can you tell me the way to the station?" I know that there might be other alternatives: 1- A man asked me to tell him the way to the station. 2- A man asked If I could tell him the way to the station.Read More...
You don't need = not necessaryRead More...

as of

Hello, Iran's nuclear weapons program is ongoing, and it hasn't stopped as of 2003. Is it possible to use ' since ' in place of 'as of' here? Thanks!^^Read More...
'As of' would be good here only if the verb 'hasn't' is changed to 'hadn't': 1) Iran's nuclear weapons program is ongoing, and it hadn't stopped as of 2003. 2) Iran's nuclear weapons program is ongoing, and it hasn't stopped since 2003. Sentence 1) means that in 2003, the program -- which had already started -- was still going on. In fact, it never stopped, that we know of. The last assessment was in 2003. We don't know what has happened since then. Sentence 2) means that the program is...Read More...

verb or noun

"...but what they really did was guarantee that everyone stayed in their seat." I was wondering if the "guarantee" in the above sentence was a verb or a noun?Read More...
Yes,Mido is right. 'Guarantee' is a verb here. You could also say, 'What he really did was to guarantee...' This is another way to know that 'guarantee' is a verb.Read More...

TOEIC question

Dear teachers, This is a TOEIC question. Please let me know which word best completes the sentence. I think both (a) and (c) are fine. The purpose of the board meeting was ------ the architect's plans for the new office headquarters. (a) revealing (b) will reveal (c) to reveal (d) revealsRead More...
Hello, my dear, Moderators, _________________________________________________________ The sentence has 'purpose.' With 'purpose is' we need an infinitive as complement. ___________________________________________________________ Interestingly, I was also certain that 'to reveal' was the right answer to it, not because I knew well, but just because it did sound natural to me. This is the usual thing that I say. It becomes a problem when I am asked to explain because I really don't know much...Read More...

death in battle

Is this sentence correct: 1-This is a ceremony in comemoration of the death in battle of one of the contry's national heroes.Read More...
I don't see anything wrong with it, Navi, except for the typo in country's .Read More...

Anglo-Saxon?

Dear Richard, The Jutes, Saxons and Angles settled in England as the link below states. Yet I wonder why the focus is only on the Angles and Saxon hence we have a period known as the Anglo-Saxon or Old English. My question is: Why isn't it called Jutes-Saxon or Jutes-Angles? Anglo-SaxonRead More...
This is a good question for somebody from the UK, I suppose. Perhaps Mr. Crystal can explain this.Read More...
Last Reply By Richard, Moderator (Guest) · First Unread Post

Responded

The movie debutted last week. The audience responded it very well. It led the box office nationwide. In this context, is 'responded' a right verb to use? Thank youRead More...
Here's how we would say this idea in more natural, idiomatic language, my friend: The movie debuted * last week and was an instant hit . It led the box office nationwide. *Notice the spelling of debut in the simple past. By the way, the pronunciation is "day-byoo" and in the past, "day-byood."Read More...

Have/make/do

She wants to come to the dinner if they have/make pasta. She wants to come the party if they do BBQ. Do I use all the verbs 'have, make, do' correctly? Thank youRead More...
Here are the corrected sentences: She wants to come to dinner if they have/make pasta. She wants to come to the party if they make/have a barbecue .Read More...

Noun clauses ???

We have always been taught that when words such as: (what, who , how, where) introduce a noun clause, the subject + verb construction must be retained e.g: - I wonder where he is. (not where is he) - What we like about him is our little secret. (not what do we like...) But why do we hear sentences like: - What might be terrorism for some is a holy war for others. Shouldn't it be: - What terrorism might be for some is a holy war for others.Read More...
I really don't think that this has to do with parallelism ,Richard. I think it has to do with the subjective complement that renames "what" in a noun clause. If the subjective complement was an adjective, things would be easier : -What is strange is his behaviour. (not: what strange is). But the problem here is that the SC is a noun (terrorism). Mathematics might help: -What is x is Y.(what is his name doesn't concern you "incorrect" ) -What X is is Y. (what his name is doesn't concern you).Read More...

To wind/winding

She reminded him to wind/winding the clock every Sunday. Should I use 'to wind or winding'? Thank youRead More...
You need the infinitive verb, Welkins. You remind somebody to do something.Read More...

Resolutions.

Her resolutions are to party a little, to go out a litte and have a little. Should I use singlular or plural on resoultion? Thank youRead More...
You're right, my friend. That's not going to work.Read More...

Had

She hoped that she was not a little self centered if she said that 'she would go if they had chips and sodas for the party.' Is 'had' used correctly? If not, which is a better word? Thank youRead More...
Yes, the sentence is fine. 'Had' is correct because it its tense is governed by 'said.' And 'said' is past because the main verb of the sentence is past: 'hoped.' If the reporting verb were in the present tense, the situation would be different: She hopes that she was not a little self centered if she says that 'she will go if they have chips and sodas for the party.' But, the sentence is about 'hoped.' The verbs are past: She hoped that she was not a little self centered if she said that...Read More...

suffer

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Which is correct? "Most miners suffer ... from tunnel collapse and from flooding." a. die b. death c. dead d. dying I chose (b). Is it correct? Thanks.Read More...
Yes, Mido is right. 'Suffer' could take only a noun, which is 'death' here, or possibly an adverb like 'greatly,' which isn't a choice.Read More...

Doing jumping Jacks

- I found some pics of her with these two kids. So I figured that she was probably married, but I kept going through and couldn't find any pics of any guy. BUT I ended up forgetting about it since she apparently had two kids. - Well a couple of months later I was talking to her and she had one of her kids with her. So during the conversation I thought it would be a good time to bring up the other one. Ends up that she doesn't have two kids. The other kid was a cousin. And she was single. So...Read More...
"The other one" must refer to the other child. She had one with her and the speaker brought up the subject of the other one. But if the other kid was a cousin, who is the kid with her now??? "Doing jumping Jacks in my head" means imagining yourself jumping up and down for joy. Jumping Jacks are actually a common exercise -- you jump in the air and land with your legs spread out while you clap your hands above your head. Then jump again and land with your feet together and hands at your side.Read More...

parks department

Tom worked for a long time in the parks deaprtment . What does the expression in bold mean? Thanks!Read More...
the parks department : is the agency/administration responsible for gardens, parks, trees, etc.Read More...

One in 16 US doctors has/have helped.....

One in 16 US doctors has/have helped at least one patient commit suicide. Which is correct, has or have? AppleRead More...
And Rachel, do you know this disputable grammar point is often tested? And the answer is always Plural. He's one of the doctors who have helped a patient in this way. The explanation is: He is one of the doctors. The doctors have helped a patient in this way. So when we combine, WHO refers to the doctors. This explains why the verb is plural.Read More...

Well done job

- When my boss is here, there's a tension that permeates everything. Your breath catches in your chest and just sticks there for the entire day—no heartburn or reflux medicine can remove the feeling! The man never recognizes anyone for a job well done, yet he never yells at anyone for screwing up. He rarely ever cracks a smile or laughs, but he doesn't yell. It's almost like he's a robot, an automaton that lives to sit in his office and go over minute details of things people will never see...Read More...
The person who wrote this piece came up with that descriptive way to say that the employees are always very tense when the boss is around. You're right in calling it a figurative way of describing this feeling, Nammy. Understand that this is not a commonly used figure of speech; it's this writer's unique way of describing how the employees feel around the boss. As for that other sentence, it's perfectly correct. There's a bit of ellipsis in the sentence: The man never recognizes anyone for a...Read More...

a road sweeper

Something very strange happened to me the other night. As I was going home this man came up to me. He had untidy hair and paint all over his clothes. He told me that he was the head of the local council and that he was offering me a job as _____________. a. a road sweeper b. the road sweeper c. road sweeper Are they all correct? What's the difference? Thanks!Read More...
Probably 'a road sweeper' would be correct. This would indicate that it's a job ; there are two or more road sweeper jobs in existence. It could be the job if the speaker is referring to the only existing road sweeping job. And, it could be just road sweeper (without any article) if it is a certain job, but usually an office held at a high level, as in He's now president of the company . So, in this passage it's possible that any of the three might be used. Since the man who's offering the...Read More...

speak

engfan
what is the difference between talk and speak i speak French i talk FrenchRead More...
With the names of languages, we always use 'speak.' Your sentence is this: I speak French. It's often difficult to know which verb to use: say, speak, talk or tell . A discussion of these verbs is attached below.Read More...

special verbs + ing?

Hi Some friends argue that the verbs "hope" and "refuse" can be followed by a gerund (ing) and they say that this is a special case e.g: - I hope seeing him soon. (rather than to see) - I refuse going to his parents anymore. (rather than to go). I find this strange, is that true?? thanksRead More...
Thanks Rachel! That is what I thought tooRead More...
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