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adjective sequence??

Hi I can't decide on the correct adjective sequence in the following: 1. A brilliant handsome American teacher. or 2. A handsome brilliant American teacher. and 3. A wild dangerous jungle animal. or 4. A dangerous wild jungle animal. The rule says opinion adjectives come before adjectives of size and shape. but I see that (handsome and briliant) are both opinion adjectives and the same is true for (dangerous/wild)?? Any help??Read More...
Thank you all. I really don't have a problem with 1 and 2 at all now, but it is number 3 that still doesn't make sense to me. As Rachel said there is a collocation between "wild" and "animal" so 4 must be the correct sequence.Read More...

Shallow

She is upto page 20th in the book. It is shallow. So far nothing is interesting what the author is written. Can I use 'shallow' to describe a book? Thank youRead More...
This is ONLY a personal observation: The New York Times (which some people consider the most important newspaper in the United States) is thought by many people to be a model of proper English. It regularly hires people to review new books. Those writers have, indeed, described some books as "shallow."Read More...

long / wonderful / great holiday

Can I say, She went on a long / wonderful / great holiday to Europe.Read More...
Do you mean can we use any of those adjectives, Vincent? The answer is, "Yes." She went on a long holiday to Europe. She went on a wonderful holiday to Europe. She went on a great holiday to Europe. Do you mean can we combine the adjectives? Yes, we can: She went on a great, wonderful long holiday to Europe. She went on a wonderful, great long holiday to Europe. She went on a long, great, wonderful holiday to Europe.Read More...

densely-populated

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Are they correct and are they the same meaning? 1. New York is more desely-populated than Los Angeles. 2. New York is bigger than Los Angeless in population. Thanks.Read More...
Thank you, Rachel, for your detailed explantion.Read More...

Made the first move to

- After dating for a while, I recognized that my girlfriend and I were not very compatible. Then she told me that she had two-timed me. I was the first person who made the first move to break up. - Are these sentences natural? Thanks very much to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
The first two sentences are natural. In the first sentence, 'recognized' is all right. A more usual verb here would be 'realized.' The third sentence is good except for the first 'first.' Since you say that you made the first move, you don't need -- indeed, shouldn't have -- 'the first person.' Instead, just say: 'I was the person who made the first move.'Read More...

dress

engfan
Hello, When can I use wear, put on and dress? Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Engfan: ‘Wear’ is to have something on your body. For example: • She’s wearing a red dress. ‘Put on’ is the action of starting to wear something: • She took off her jeans and put on a red dress. ‘Dress’ means ‘put on’: • She dressed in a hurry. More frequently, we say ‘get dressed’ meaning to put on clothes, or ‘be dressed’ meaning to wear clothes: • She got dressed in a hurry. • She was dressed in red from head to toe. See these entries from the LDOCE:...Read More...

hundreds

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Which is correct: 1. I want to live for hundreds years. 2. I want to live for hundreds of years. Thanks.Read More...
'Hundreds' is correct here, Coco: I want to live for hundreds of years. When 'hundred' does not have another number in front of it, we say 'hundreds.' If there were, say, 'three' in front of 'hundred,' we'd say 'three hundred years.' Here's the definition of 'hundred' from the LDOCE: http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/hundredRead More...

on duty

What do we say if we want to ask permission to do our duty (as a perfect during recess)? (i) A: Sir, may I go out to do / for doing my duty? B: Certainly. (ii) A: Sir, may I go to do my duty?Read More...
In this case, 'excused' refers to being excused from class. So the sentence means: May I be excused from class to do/ perform by recess duties?Read More...

clap/ claps

could i say, (a) The audience claps / clap their hand loudly. Audience is uncountable ? Shall i use "claps"?Read More...
Yes, in British English, the phrase would be, 'The audience have ' This is good for the original sentence. However, Vincent has modified the sentence to be ' one of the audience.' Because of 'one,' the verb would be singular.Read More...

Subject-Verb Agreement

Dear teachers, Please advise me which one is correct in the following pairs of sentences. 1) Two spoonfuls of salt is added to the water. 2) Two spoonfuls of salt are added to the water. 3) There is two spoonfuls of sugar in my tea. 4) There are two spoonfuls of sugar in my tea. 5) There has been a spate of robberies in the area recently. 6) There have been a spate of robberies in the area recently.Read More...
Let’s talk about ‘spoonfuls’ first. 1) Two spoonfuls of salt is added to the water. This sentence is fine when you are thinking more of the total quantity of salt. In this respect, it is like measurements of distance, money, and time ( five miles is, ten dollars is, fifteen minutes is ). There are thousands of examples on Google like these: • Two spoonfuls of chlorine is all that's needed, according to him. We don't know enough about these things yet to even know the right ... • Two...Read More...

an exercise

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Is this exercise correct? "... exhibitions are like huge market places for the sale of goods, and these are often called trade fairs. a. Most of b. A great many c. A great deal of d. Many of I don't know which to choose. Thanks.Read More...
The item is correct, and it is a good item. B is correct: 'A great many.' _______ A is not correct, because with 'most of' we need the: 'Most of the exhibitions.' C is not possible because 'a great deal of' goes with noncount nouns, and 'exhibitions' is a plural count noun. D is not possible because, like 'most of,' 'many of' requires 'the': 'Many of the exhibitions.Read More...

Among her friends

- Betsy doesn't have a lover but she has a closest friend among her friends. He has soulful eyes and a calm disposition. - Are these natural to say? Thanks a lot to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
You could eliminate 'among her friends.' Otherwise, the sentence is natural: Betsy doesn't have a lover, but she has a closest friend/ special friend/ close friend/ dear friend. The second sentence is fine. It matters whether these sentences are for speaking or for writing. The way the sentences are now, I think that they are for writing. Right? I am not sure if 'lover' is the actual word you want. It may be, but 'man/ guy/ boy friend/ fiance/ someone special' are other choices, among many.Read More...

Let's you and I

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "Let 's you and I agree to cancel the last shipment unless the company meets our conditions." I realize that there are some mistakes in the sentence: 1. Let's => "'s" should be omitted. 2. "agree to cancel" is correct but it can be changed to "agree on cancelling". Please tell me if all my comments are correct. Thanks.Read More...
Thank you, Rachel, so much.Read More...

a card of introductory

Do we say, I want to make a card of introductory. P/s: There are many personal details like name, age,hobby, address, etc in the card. What do we call this card?Read More...
I'm guessing 'personal card' or 'social card.' Anyone?Read More...

Miss the most

- The person who James miss the most when studying away from home is his sister. However, whenever he's home, his mother is very tired of arguments between him and his sister. - Are these sentences grammatical? Thanks so much to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
The sentences are good, Namcoolguy, except that I think there is a typo: 'miss' should be 'misses.' It's the verb that goes with 'James.' Maybe you are wondering about the third word, 'who.' Maybe you think it should be 'whom.' It could be 'whom' as the object of 'misses' in the adjective clause; however, 'who' in place of 'whom' is acceptable in most instances these days. Maybe you are wondering about the pronoun 'him' towards the end. 'Him' is correct because it is the object of the...Read More...

turn up / down the fan

How do we say if I had already switched on the fan, I want to "turn up" the number from 1 to 4 ? Dialogue A: Today is very hot, please turn up the speed of the fan. / please turn the number 4. B: Ok, I will. ==================== How do we say If I want to lower down the speed of the fan? from 4 to 1? Dialogue A: Today is cold, please turn down to number 1 for the fan. B: Yes. ================== Do we say, (a) Please lower down the fan. It's cool. (b) Please speed up the fan,it's quite hot. ...Read More...
No, I would not say sentences (c) and (d). the first two are OK.Read More...

Few pleasures

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "Few pleasures can equal.....of a cook drink on a hot day." a. some b. any c. that d. those I chose "d =those" but the answer is "c=that". Please explain to me. Thanks.Read More...
This is ONLY my opinion. "Few pleasures can equal THAT of a cool drink on a hot day" is probably a short way to say: "Few pleasures can equal THE PLEASURE of a cool drink on a hot day." Thank you.Read More...

full

I went up there full of fire and brimstone. Is this correct sentence? And does 'full of fire and brimstone' modify 'I'? Thanks a lot!Read More...
This is ONLY my opinion. I think that your teacher would be very happy if you said that the prepositional phrase "of fire and brimstone" modified the adjective "full," and that "full" modified "I." Thank you.Read More...

Using after with the future simple

Dear Richard & Rachel , I have been told the following : ( The Simple Future cannot be used in clauses beginning with time expressions like after ). ** Would you please let me know your comment / kind explanation with examples? I'm waiting for your kind reply. Thank you very much. SayedRead More...
You're welcome Rachel.I'm glad that I could help.Read More...

of given/ of being given

The following is from an article in Reader’s Digest. As a result, the complainant [verbal abuse] is usually deported instead of given the opportunity to opt for a change of employer. My question: Is it acceptable to use “given” instead of “being given” after “of”? AppleRead More...
Re: of given/ of being givenRead More...

like me???

What does the following sentences mean? 1. You are not tall like me. 2. You are not tall as I am. Does it mean : I am taller than you? or we both are not tall? And what if we use a comma? 3. You are not tall, like me. 4. You are not tall, as I am.Read More...
All the sentences as they are are all right grammatically and at first glance, mean the same thing: the speaker is saying that he is tall and the other person is not tall. I think that sentence 1) is fine. The speaker is saying that he is tall but the other person is not tall. ‘Like’ is a preposition, of course, with ‘me’ as its object. This sentence is somewhat informal, even perhaps juvenile. Sentence 2) means the same thing as Sentence 1), and the style is a little formal. This sentence...Read More...
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