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to give../because he had to give

Hello, I am moving to other country. The logistic company's worker dropped by to give me those cartons where I have to put my things in. Please tell me which one is correct. 1. He wanted to see me to give me the boxes I need to put my things in it for shipment. 2. He wanted to see me because he had to give me the boxes I need to put my things in for shipment. Thanks a lot.Read More...
Mehrdad's sentences are fine, but we can condense this sentence, too, if we want: He came/ wants to give me the shipping boxes.Read More...

a little

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "Some earthworms grow to a very large size five or six feet in most of them are a little inches long." Please tell me three points: 1. "a little" cannot be placed before "inches". It should be before "long" -> a little long. 2. There should be a commas before "most of them" 3. Is "in" necessary or redundant? Thanks.Read More...
1. "a little long" won't work here either. You would use that to mean "a little too long." For example a dress is a little (too) long if it touches the floor. You can say a few inches long. 2. You need a period or a semicolon here, not a comma. You can use a comma if you put but in the sentence. 3. In here is wrong. But I'm a little uncomfortable with "most of them" because the reader might think at first it refers to some earthworms that are very big. I've also played with the punctuation a...Read More...

It doesn't matter

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please tell me if my choice would be correct. "You were so nice to help me book the room." "....." a. Never mind b. That's all right c. It doesn't matter d. Really Is it (c)? Thanks.Read More...
I think A is best, but in real life I think I'd say more: "Never mind. It was no trouble." I think B is also possible, but perhaps again with something more. "That's all right. It was no trouble." or "That's all right. I didn't mind at all."Read More...

there is/are

Are the following sentences correct? 1. There are about a hundred people waiting outside the H&M store. 2. There are about a hundred people who are waiting outside the H&M store. 3. There are about a hundred people wait outside the H&M store.Read More...
Sentences 1 & 2 are both OK, but sentence 1 is probably more common. Sentence 3 is not OK. But your topic is about is/are. You didn't ask about that. In informal speech you could also say "There's about a hundred people (who are) waiting outside the H&M store."Read More...

Indonesia/Indonesian

I just saw this headline on the Web: Dozens (are) feared dead in Indonesia landslide. Is there a difference between "Indonesia landslide" and "Indonesian" landslide. Is one "more correct" than the other? Thank you.Read More...
Thanks to everybody for the delicious food for thought. I just noticed that my (our?) hero, Mr. Fowler, was upset even back in "the old days" because some people (journalists?) were referring to "an England eleven" instead of "an English eleven." (Needless to say, I had to check my dictionary to understand "eleven.")Read More...

perfect infinitive and participle(gerund).

Hi, Could you please tell me the nuance between the perfect infinitive and participle(gerund)? Because; a-Infinitive is about 'potentiality'; but, b-Gerund(participle) is about actual or past event/action . an example for clarification : i know to have killed him = i know that i killed him ..(in this sentence 'know' is present but 'killed' is past and unpotential beacuse of already having happened in the past )...so,why not: i know having killed him = i know that i killed him. Thanks.Read More...
Thank you Okaasan..Read More...

if not all

Hi Do you think (1) sounds OK to you? (1)Some, if not all, of the students were there. In fact, all of them were. If the second sentence follows the first one, the problem seems to be due to the interferences of my mother tongue. Thank you in advance Seiichi MYOGARead More...
Dear Amy, I appreciate your help and comments. Could you help us a step further? If we'd like to add anything, does it go like this? (2)Some, if not all, of the students were there. [In fact/Rather], all of them [might / may] have been (there). My reasoning: The first sentence in (2) is used to implicate (3). (3)It's likely that all of the students were there. If what follows it refers to a possibility (but not to a fact), the two sentences will be consistent, resulting in being acceptable.Read More...

participle sentence

Dear teachers, In this grammar quiz, When your orders ________ the $ 5,000 mark, your discount will be increased to 15%. a) reached b) have reached c) will reach d) reaching the answer is b) have reached. But I wondered why d) reaching can't be an answer because I thought that it is participle sentence. Thank you in advance.Read More...
Yes, Amy is right. Another way to use a participle phrase (without necessarily matching the subjects in the two parts) would be: My orders having reached the $5,000 mark, they gave me an increased discount on my orders.Read More...

adverbs again

Which are correct: 1-They attacked Julia in her wedding gown. 2-They attacked Julia, in her wedding gown. 3-They attacked the bride in her wedding gown. 4-They attacked the bride, in her wedding gown. Meaning: They attacked the Julia/ the bride when she was in her wedding gown.Read More...
BTW, Navi, the title you've chosen for this thread is adverbs again , but please notice that "in her wedding gown" is adjectival.Read More...

writing on /at a memo.

Can I say, (a) He is writing (an important appointment on) a memo. (b) He is writing notes /a note on the memo. (c) He is writing on /at a memo.Read More...
I would say He is writing a memo or possibly He is writing notes/an appointment in a memo. "Memo" is not the paper itself; it's the content of what you write. You write something on paper but in a memo. Of course, once the memo is written on paper, then "memo" can refer to the paper on which it is written. Of course, nowadays memos are often in the form of e-mail.Read More...

connector

Can I say, (a) The cat has white fur, brown spots and a tail. (b) The cat has white fur with brown spots and a tail.Read More...
I agree with Mehrdad. Both are OK but (b) is better. I think because "brown spots" is part of "white fur." If you were talking about something totally different, the structure of (a) with the comma is better: The cat has white fur, six toes on each foot(,) and a tail. The second comma is optional -- a style choice -- but I prefer it.Read More...

lonely/lonesome

Is there any difference between lonely and lonesome?Read More...
Dictionaries list them as synonyms, and they are often used interchangeably. However, I feel that 'lonely' describes a deeper, more desperate feeling than 'lonesome.' 'Lonesome' also seems more temporary, and describes a situation more possible of being improved. Also, 'lonely' seems more formal, and more likely to be used to describe one's psychological state. 'Lonesome' seems less formal, and more likely to describe a social state. But, for the most part, either one can be used in many ...Read More...

it or this?

"Prof. Brown suggests that filtering occurs in the architectural profession. It/This is supported by Prof. Maddock who believes that..." Should I use "it" or "this" in cases like this? What will be the difference?Read More...
Both are correct. 'This is Alex' is more business like. 'It's Alex' is more friendly and chatty.Read More...

should

I see the following example sentence in LDOCE: - She worried lest he should tell someone what had happened. I wonder what difference does the word "should" make here? Can't we just say "she worried lest he tell someone what had happened"?Read More...
Mehrdad's right. Here's a previous posting: http://thegrammarexchange.info...391015111#7391015111Read More...

Usage of Find

Dear teachers, Please let me know if the following three sentences are all correct. (A) She found the box to contain nothing. (B) She found the box containing nothing. (C) She found the box contain nothing. If so, what would be the difference between them?Read More...
Seiichi Myoga and Amy, I appreciate your kind advice. Thank you very much. Meantime, this is just a personal question to Seiichi Myoga. I think Myoga is a Japanese name of a certain edible plant widely enjoyed by many Janpanese. Am I right? I am also curious about your extensive knowledge of English grammar. Are you an English professor? If you think my question is too personal, I apologize for my rudeness.Read More...

What I found

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "What I found surprising was his lack of confidence." If I rewrite this sentence, would it be: "I found it surprising knowing his lack of confidence." Thanks.Read More...
Hi Coco There are a number of ways you could rewrite that sentence. Are you required to use "I found" again? If so, I'd suggest this: - "I found his lack of confidence surprising."Read More...

no and not

Can I assume that it is the same to say "I don't know, I'm not a dentist" and "I don't know, I'm no dentist"?Read More...
Hi Alex There is no real difference in meaning. To me, the only difference is one of focus. The use of "no" focuses the negation on the noun, and thus it may often be perceived as being more emphatic.Read More...

by ten years?

Hello, She is is much older than him, by fifty years . Does this phrasing exist at all? A million thanks, GE!Read More...
Thank you very much!Read More...

in southern/in the southern..

Hello, There are many rich people in the southern part of the city. There are many rich people in southern part of the city. Which one is correct? Thank you!Read More...
Hi iwtk You should use "in the southern part". If you used "part s " rather than "part", then it would be possible to write the sentence with OR without the word "the".Read More...

we have been waiting

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please tell me if I chose correctly. "If there are not any tickets left when we reach the front of the queue, we ...... all this time for nothing." a. will have been waiting b. will be waiting c. have been waiting d. will wait. I chose (c). Thanks.Read More...
Dear Rachel, Thank you very much. I got it at once.Read More...

deletion of "to be" and "being"

Hi I think both (ia) and (ib) are fine (Correct me if I'm mistaken). (i) a. She believed her husband to be like her father. b. She saw her husband as being like her father. But what about (ii)? (ii) a. She believed her husband like her father. b. She saw her husband as like her father. I assume that neither (iia) or (iib) is acceptable. Do you agree? Thank you in advance Seiichi MYOGARead More...
Dear Amy I appreciate your help and comments. We can't thank you, expert teachers enough for spending your time helping us "stray sheep" in the land of the English language. Seiichi MYOGARead More...

with or without "like"

Hi Pay attention to Speaker B's responses. (1) A: Is she shy? (i) B: She looks it but she isn't. (ii) B: She looks like it but she isn't. (2) A: Is she a college student? (iii)B: She looks it but she isn't. (iv) B: She looks like it but she isn't. Do you agree that only (ii) is wrong? Thank you in advance Seiichi MYOGARead More...
Dear Rachel, I appreciate your help and comments. You've answered part of my next question. My bet is that Sentence (v) may work. (3) A: (Look at Sue. She isn't talking to anyone.) She looks lonely. (v) B: She looks like that but she isn't. And what I'm not sure of is that (vi) works as well as (vii). (4) A: Is she a college student? (vi)B: She looks that but she isn't. (vii) B: She looks like that but she isn't. What do you think? Seiichi MYOGARead More...

after

We'd had lunch after the meeting finished. Could anyone tell how come the past perfect was used here?Read More...
This is a difficult point to understand. Thanks, Amy and Okaasan, for your clarifying remarks. Not too long ago, we had a discussion on the same topic, the apparent illogical use of the past perfect tense. As Amy and Okaasan have indicated, and I have too, this unusual use of the past perfect, in context, turns out to be logical. While the past perfect construction is not necessary in contexts like these, it can be used, particularly to supply background information. Here's more than you...Read More...
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