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preparing the dining table

What do it mean by "she is preparing / setting the dining table"?Read More...
We say, 'She is setting the (dining) table.' This means that she is putting the plates and the eating utensils and the napkins in front of each person's chair on the table.Read More...

meals / a meal

Can I say, She wakes up early and prepares meals / a meal for us .Read More...
If you say, 'She wakes up early and prepares a meal for us,' the meal is probably breakfast. That's the meal she prepares, and wakes up early for. If you say, 'She wakes up early and prepares meals for us,' you are referring to all the meals that you eat, that is, breakfast, lunch, and dinner. So both are correct, but they mean different things.Read More...

Is this a correct definition of the word "colour"

Hi, My friend bought a dictionary in the Indian subcontinent and the definition for colour is as follows: Sensation produced on the eye by decomposed light Just wondering what you think of that definition. Thanks. Warmest regards, SusanRead More...
Yes, Susan, I think the definition is all right. Here's a similar definition provided by Concise Oxford English Dictionary : The property possessed by an object of producing different sensations on the eye as a result of the way it reflects or emits light.Read More...

-ing form

joan
Why do we use using in the sentence below ? a picture produced using a cameraRead More...
Yes, we could say there is an ellipsis at work there. The original sentence would be: A picture which was produced by using a camera "Using" is often used this way to mean "by" or "through:" A picture produced by a cameraRead More...

present or past

1-Some members of the committee(are OR were) absent? 2- the public (is OR was) invited to attend the meeting. 3- many people on the ship (are OR were ) getting seasick from the violent waves. Thank youRead More...
Just read the instruction on the very same page. It says, "Put parentheses around the entire subject of each sentence, and underline the word that the verb agrees with. Then fill in the proper form of the verb. Use only the present tense. " This is a type of exercise that concentrates on the subject-verb agreement, not on the tenses.Read More...

wear/put on your clothes

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Can I say either "wear your clothes" or "put on your clohes"in this sentence? Are they both correct? "Wear/Put on your clothes; it has begun to rain." Thanks.Read More...
Hi Coco From a strictly grammatical standpoint, that sentence is fine with either 'wear' or 'put on'. However, without any context, the meaning that sentence tends to suggest is that the person is naked, and now that person is being told to wear or put on clothes because it is raining. A more logical stand-alone sentence would be something like this: - Put on a raincoat; it has begun to rain.Read More...

all his clothes/his whole clothes

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "He jumped into the river with .......clothes on." a. all his clothes b. his whole clothes Please tell me their difference. Thanks.Read More...
Hi Coco Option (b) is not idiomatic. The word 'clothes' is grammatically plural. However, you should use 'his whole' with grammatically singular nouns such as wardrobe, career, life, body, team, etc.Read More...

a number/the number

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please show me the way to choose the correct phrase "a number of" and "the number of"? "..... of children in that area .... poor diet" a. A number / have b. The number /have c. The number / has Thanks.Read More...
No, Coco. This is 'the number....is.' 'The number' refers to the name of the number. 'The number of xxx' is singular. Mehrdad is correct that 'a number of' takes a plural verb. The plural verb refers to the plural count noun -- sometimes ellipted -- after 'of.' In this case the noun is 'children.' 'The number of' takes a singular verb. 'The number of' is a description of an actual number. We would say: A (great, for example) number of people were injured. BUT The number of people injured in...Read More...

Kept / raised / had gold fish

Can I say, (a) He reared / raised goldfish in an aquarium. (b) He kept / had gold fish in the aquarium. (c) He gave fish food to goldfish in the aquarium. (any suitbale to say "fish food"?).Read More...
(a) He raised goldfish in an aquarium. (b) He kept / had gold fish in the aquarium. (c) He gave fish food to (the) goldfish in the aquarium.Read More...

Article - the taekwondo

Do we say, (a) He learnt taekwondo / learnt the taekwondo when he was 8 yeard old. (b) He enjoys (the) taekwondo lesson. / He enjoys learning (the) taekwondo (lesson). (c) He goes for / attends (the) taekwondo for one hour. (d) He goes for (the) taekwondo lesson every Saturdays. (e) (The) taekwondo lasts 1 hour.Read More...
[quote](a) He learnt taekwondo when he was 8 years old. (b) He enjoys the/0 taekwondo lesson. / He enjoys learning taekwondo. (c) He goes to/ attends the taekwondo lesson for one hour. (d) He goes for the/a taekwondo lesson every Saturday. ______ About 'the': We would use 'the' if the lesson has been previously referred to. After the first mention of the singular count noun, 'lesson,' used with 'a,' then we need another article or a determiner before the singular count noun. Here you could...Read More...

Commas around appositive' use of 'for'

Dear teachers~ "Result of these exams affect the entire family because there is high status, or social position, for the whole family when the children have high test scores." 1) In this sentence, why the second comma needed? Without the second comma, isn't it okay? 2) The use of 'for' Does prepositon 'for' refer to 'representing'? I mean that social position represent the whole family. Thanks in advanceRead More...
Yes, Mehrad is right about 'affectS' since the subject is 'result.' However, both he and I have overlooked the lack of the word 'the.' Because 'result' is a singular count noun, it needs an article or other determiner in front of it. So the sentence has to be this: The results of these exams affect the entire family. Talk about great minds!Read More...

kang Sun-bo..?

Hello, The 46-year-old victim in Ansan, identified only by his surname Lee, was abducted on Feb. 11 in his apartment's basement parking lot. His abductors demanded 300 million won ($262,927) in cash. His former driver, identified by the surname Kim, was fired in 2006. He has since had no sustainable income sources and been suffering from gambling debts, according to the police. In addition to the five arrested already, another suspect has been put on the wanted list. "Kim appears to have...Read More...
Indeed, yes, Iwtk. Apparently the word 'said' has been accidentally left out.Read More...

sitting for / joining in

Can I say, (a) The pupils are sitting for the art competition. (b) The pupils are joining (in) the art competition.Read More...
We also have "sit for an exam," which means "take an exam," but as Amy noted, here it seems as if "sit for" means "pose for an artisit."Read More...

listen to the radio / on the radio

Which is correct? (a) He is listening to / on the radio. (b) He is listening to the music on / to the radio. (c) He listened the radio.Read More...
(a) He is listening to the radio. (b) He is listening to the music on the radio. (c) He listened to the radio. Your sentences do not sound really fine without adding more to them.Read More...

take/follow advice

cocoricot
Dear teachers, 1. My sister followed my advice so she went to university. 2. My sister took my advice and went to university. I think both sentences are correct. Are "follow advice" and "take advice" correct phrases? Please show me which word spoiled the sentence (1) so that the correct answer is only (2)? Thanks.Read More...
I agree with you. Both "follow my advice" and "take my advice" are correct.Read More...

more five minutes

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "To finish this exercise, I need ...." a. another five minutes b. more five minutes. I guess that (a) would be correct but please explain why (b) would be wrong. Thanks.Read More...
Yes, Coco, a) is the correct completion. We don't say more five minutes . We say, 'five more minutes.' 'More' modifies 'minutes': more minutes. 'Five' modifies 'more.' You could also say, 'five minutes more.'Read More...

What are noun things?

What are nouns? person, place, thing, qualities Person – Mickey, Nicholas, Susan, soldier, sailor, teacher, tailor Place – Singapore, Beijing, Shang Hai, the Singapore zoo Thing – book, chair, table, pen, money. I will bring my things with me. There are a lot of things in my handbag. Qualities/ideas – freedom Are the things I have put in the things list correct. Thanks for your comments.Read More...
Thank you Rachel and thank you Mehrdad, Contributor. Much appreciated. Susan.Read More...

Turn left at / on

Can I say, (a) She turned left at / on / before / after the T-junction. (b) Turn left at the roundabout. (c) Take the first turning on your left at the roundabout.Read More...
we drive on the left in my country, so, what do we say?Read More...

double their size

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Is this sentence correct? "Even though they are among the smallest carnivores, weasels will attact animals that are double their size." I have to find mistakes but I can't find one. Thanks.Read More...
Hi, Amy, This time it seems great minds just don't think alike! Lol! That's interesting. Maybe others could share their thoughts too. Thanks.Read More...

hanging

Can I say, The starfruits are hanging on the trees.Read More...
In theory, you could say that, but it's hard to imagine when a person might actually say it. Try to add more detail to your sentences, bear_bear. Even something like this would seem more realistic: - There are hardly any starfruits hanging on the trees. - There are hundreds of starfruits hanging on the tree.Read More...

reschedule

I wonder if it would be convenient for you to reschedule for Friday. I wonder if it would be convenient for you if we rescheduled for Friday. Do these two sentences above have the same meaning?Read More...
I just saw yours, too, Mehrdad! The GE team is active this morning (the evening where you are).Read More...

along

Are these sentences correct: 1-He kicked the ball along the touch line to Harry. (Meaning: He kicked the ball so that it moved on the touch line and reached Harry.) 2-He kicked the ball alongside the touch line to Harry. (Meaning: He kicked the ball so that it moved on a line close and parallel to the touch line and reached Harry.)Read More...
I think that your interpretations are right, Navi. To express motion, 'along' means right on something, in a line. 'Alongside' means next to that line. 'Along' can also mean 'alongside, 'but 'alongside' can't mean 'along' in this way. Definitions of these words from the LDOCE: http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/along_2 http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/alongsideRead More...

fell / fell off / fell down

Can I say, The wall fell off / fell/ fell down and damaged the car.Read More...
You can say, 'The wall fell/ fell down and damaged the car.' 'Fell off' is not correct. You would use 'fell off' in this way: 'The picture fell off the wall and damaged the floor.'Read More...
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