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would

1. I would welcome the opportunity to do business with you. 2. I welcome the opportunity to do business with you. Is there difference between the two sentences?Read More...
Thank you, Okaasan. It's really helped me a lot.Read More...

P.P & P.P.C

I........the Olympics every four years for my whole life (a) have watched (b) have been watchingRead More...
Both the present perfect and the present perfect continuous are correct in this sentence, and actually, mean about the same thing. With 'I have watched,' the focus is more on the fact that you have completed many years of watching the Olympica every four years. (Me, too.)I have been watching' focuses more on the continuing nature of the activity, and hints more strongly that you will continue to watch all the Olympic matches every four year forever. The present perfect continuous does not...Read More...

admit?confess? different structures?

Which is correct please: 1. He admitted to the killing of his wife. 2. He admitted the killing of his wife. 3. He admitted to killing his wife. 4. He admitted killing his wife. 5. He admitted to having killed his wife. 6. He admitted having killed his wife. 7. He confessed to killing his wife. 8. He confessed killing his wife. 9. He confessed that he had killed his wife. My answer is that all are correct except 8. Any help??Read More...
I agree with Okaasan that the use of 'the' seems odd. In fact, the addition of 'the' in both sentences 1 and 2 makes it sound as though you mean this: - He admitted that his wife had been killed. (i.e. he admitted that somebody had killed his wife.) As for number 8, it's more common with 'to', but you'll hear that wording (i.e. without the word 'to') on occasion. Here are a couple of examples from COCA: - ...he confessed being caught off guard by greed in the financial sector. - Those...Read More...

I understand completely

cocoricot
Dear teachers, - ........... - I understand completely. a. I'm sorry. I didn't mean to hurt you. b. Watch out! Be careful! c. Have you understood it? d. Those are beautiful. Is (c) correct? Thanks.Read More...
"Like Okaasan..."??? I was leaning towards (c) as the answer! I think it's a lousy test item. Neither question seems to really fit the reply.Read More...

help me!!

I don't know that why english distinguish 1st, 2nd, 3rd subject. ... ... that is too poor thinking? ... hmmm.... T^T ah!! thanks Mehrdad. I was helped your reply.Read More...
Is something missing here? Has something been deleted?Read More...

attend/have (a) class

Is there a general rule as to the article usage in "attend/ have (a) class"? Do you have (a) class this morning? I attend (a) class every Friday afternoon. Is there a difference between the sentences with or without "a"? AppleRead More...
Yes, I think that's about right, Rachel. Also, if I know or am pretty sure the other person has class at a particular time, I could say Do you have class at three? No article. But if I have no idea of the person's schedule, I would more likely use the article: Do you have a class at three?Read More...

spend

Hi!! Is it OK to say "I am spending a lot of money with clothes' or should we say on clothes? Thanks!Read More...
Hi! We say, 'spend a lot of money on something.' In this case, we'd say, 'spend a lot of money on clothes.' We can also spend a lot of money on cars, on education, on food, and so many other things.Read More...

having been left

Her phone ___________ in the office, she couldn't respond to the call. a. having been left b. being left Are they both correct? If so, what's the differnece? Thanks!Read More...
I prefer (a), but I think (b) is correct too. "Being left" is in the past here too. It indicates that her phone was left in the office.Read More...

stunted

cocoricot
Dear teachers, When I looked up the word "stunted" in the dictionary, it gave me the example "He's emotiionally stunted" but I can't understand what it means. Please give me some explanations. Thanks.Read More...
Hi Coco As you know, people mature in many different ways as they grow from children to adults. People mature as they grow. If a certain aspect of a person's growth is stopped before reaching full maturity, then that aspect is 'stunted'. So, for example, if a 25-year-old man has the emotional maturity of a 12-year-old boy, then that man is emotionally stunted. His emotional growth stopped prematurely.Read More...

six of which

cocoricot
Dear teachers, " Those interested in covered bridges can find six of which between Keen and Winchester." It is an exercise of finding mistakes. The answer is "which" but I don't think so. I think it would be "covered". Please help me. Thanks.Read More...
Thank you, Okaasan, very much. I understand now.Read More...

not much to choose

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "There is not much to choose between the two essays" Does it mean that the two essays are good and it is not easy to choose between them? Thanks.Read More...
It could mean that. But I think it could also mean that they're both bad and there isn't much difference between them to make one better than the other. The context would have to tell you which is meant. But basically "not much to choose between them" means that there's not much difference between them.Read More...

used/ secondhand

1. a used phone 2. a secondhand phone 3. When I was in college, I bought only used clothes. 4. When I was in college, I bought only secondhand clothes. Which one is more natural? Thanks a lot.Read More...
Of course, you can find anything on Google. Here are over 16,000 examples of 'gently-worn clothes': http://www.google.com/search?h...i=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai= Yes, 'refurbished' is different, in the way that you say, Mehrdad.Read More...

glance at each other.

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "Jonny and Kate didn't ........glance at each other." a. as far as b. as well as c. so long as d. so much as. Please tell me which is correct and its meaning. Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Coco: Choice D -- so much as -- is correct. It means 'even.' So, Jon and Kate didn't even glance at each other. Obviously, they were very angry.Read More...

toast and butter?

Hi. Kindly tell me whether it matters if toast and butter switched places, in the sentence below: "We usually have toast and butter for breakfast." Many thanks. GilbertRead More...
Thank you Okaasan. Thank you Rachel. Your contributions to helping us learn the English language (notice that I used the article 'the'...) will not go unrewarded in Grammar Heaven. Many thanks. GilbertRead More...

Do I need the indefinite article?

Hi and hope everyone on the GE is doing just great. Do I need the article 'a' in the sentences below? I don't know... Feels like it works with and also without the article. I have a friend who is a Korean and another who is an Indian. I have a friend who is a Christian and another who is a Muslim. Thank you. GilbertRead More...
Thank you O Wise One! I see it loud and clear - the use of NOUNS and ADJECTIVES to refer to various nationalities and religions. I am so disappointed that I couldn't figure this out myself! I shall have to do penance for this! GilbertRead More...

far

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "The blueprint is actually for five telescopes positioned 50 meters far in space." Please tell me if "far" is used to tell that this telescope is 50 meters far away other one" Thanks.Read More...
This would be a better way to word your sentence, Coco: - "The blueprint is actually for five telescopes spaced 50 meters apart ." Using "in space" makes it sound as though you are referring to outer space.Read More...

Lay vs. Lie

Are these correct? the danger that lies ahead the dangers that lay ahead NOT: the dangers that lie ahead he lay in wait for his prey he lies in wait for his prey he had lain in wait for his prey BUT NEVER: he lie in wait for his prey ThanksRead More...
Hi Victo, Since you did not capitalize the first word in any of your sentences, I will assume you did not necessarily intend them to be complete sentences. Thus, it might be possible to say "he lie in wait" if you added something to the sentence so that a common situation for the use of the present subjunctive were created. For example: - It is essential for his survival that he lie in wait for his prey. In the sentence above, the word 'lie' = present subjunctive.Read More...

Ellipsis Clarification

Sorry that this question is so long. I'm using the coded ellipsis (no spaces between dots) here, not the standard ellipsis. Thanks for your consideration in answering my question. If the omission comes after the end of a sentence, the ellipsis will be placed after the period, making a total of four dots. … Example : John said he wanted to go to the movies. … In this sentence, the ellipsis follows a complete sentence in which no words were trimmed off; thus; the period follows the word movies...Read More...
It seems that nobody on this newsgroup does have any feedback, Korn. This very specialized copy editing topic really does not generate much interest here on the Grammar Exchange, let alone any particular knowledge. In a recent post, our contributor Okaasan had these comments, which I think may be helpful: http://thegrammarexchange.info...40600179/m/747104904 In addition, I think there may be several forums and websites devoted to copy editing topics. I don't know which ones they would be,...Read More...

purpose clause

Which are correct with the given meanings: 1-I gave you that book to read. 2-I gave you that book to read it . (meaning: I gave you that book so that you'd read it.) 3-I gave you that wrench to repair your car. 4-I read those books to my children to learn English. (meaning: I read those books to my children for them to learn English.) 5-I told you that story about John to know what kind of person you are dealing with. (meaning: ... for you to know what kind of person you are dealing with.)Read More...
Hello, Navi: 1-I gave you that book to read. 2-I gave you that book to read it. (meaning: I gave you that book so that you'd read it.) • Sentence 1 is correct. The ‘it’ in sentence 2 is superfluous. _______ 3-I gave you that wrench to repair your car. • Sentence 3 means that I gave you the wrench so that you can repair your car. You could also say, ‘I gave you that wrench to repair your car with.’ This would mean that I gave you the wrench so that you can repair you car with it. _______ 4-I...Read More...

What does "cover the page" mean here?

Dear teachers, The following writing is from a speech for a high school graduate. I don't understand what "cover the page" means here. Would you explain it to me? Your official speaker will exhort you to climb every mountain and follow your passion. Your paternal speaker suggests that you climb every other mountain and keep your shirt on. But he does have a few thoughts to offer, culled from half a century of immeasurable wisdom. They should just about cover the page.Read More...
When I first read it, I could only think of the first interpretation Rachel offered above. I see that the second interpretation might work too, but I think it is a bit far-fetched, but still not really far-fetched because the speaker seems to be in favor of figurative language somehow, as s/he has earlier used "mountains" in a metaphorical way.Read More...

mid as a prefix

When we have "mid" as a prefix how do we hyphenate it? mid- to upper 50s I think that a single space follows mid-. mid-to-upper 50s, I think, is wrong. low to mid-50s ... is this correct? NOT: low-to-mid 50s because low is not a prefix. lower- to upper-middle-class neighborhood looks right to me with all the hyphens. What do you think of all 3?Read More...
Hello, emgee: The American Heritage Dictionary* says this: • USAGE NOTE Many compounds other than those entered here may be formed with mid- In forming compounds, mid- is normally joined to the following word or element without a space or hyphen: midpoint. However, if the second element begins with a capital letter, it is always separated with a hyphen: mid-May. …. Note that the adjective mid is a separate word, though, as is the case with any adjective, it may be joined to another word with...Read More...

Just after sixteen years

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "Harward University was established just after sixteen years the Pilgrims arrived." Please tell me if it is a correct sentence? Thanks.Read More...
Har v ard University was established just sixteen years after the Pilgrims arrived. I don't know if that if factually correct, but it is now grammatically correct.Read More...

"In" versus "From"

Can someone please help? I'm trying to decide which phrase would be more appropriate: "The party was made possible by the university and the generous support of the participants in the trip to China," or "The party was made possible by the university and the generous support of the partcipants from the trip to China," could someone please tell me which is acceptable, and why?Read More...
Welcome to the Grammar Exchange! We say participate in something, so I think participants in the trip to China is better. Or, to remove all doubt, you could reword it a bit: "The party was made possible by the university and the generous support of those who participated in the trip to China."Read More...

Do other languages have usage problems?

There seem to be a million (OK, a thousand) websites devoted to English usage. Is English the only language that seems to produce so many questions about what is "right" and what is "wrong"? Is it the only language that can be analyzed in different ways by different grammarians? How serious is the "usage problem" in other languages? Thank you.Read More...
Thank you, Okaasan. That is so true. I sometimes forget that.Read More...
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