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Use of verbs in Present Indefinite instead of Present Perfect

Dear Grammar Exchange members, could you tell me is there a rule about using verbs in Present Indefinite instead of Present Perfect? Examples: 1) I hear you're going to sell your car. How much do you want for it? (M. Hewings_Unit9_"Advanced Grammar in use") 2) Wait a minute, I forget what you said. 3) Previous story What I hear , I forget . 4) I understand you lived in my old room.Read More...
Dear Ahmed_btm, I am very grateful to you for your answer. Thanks a lotRead More...
Last Reply By Kursevich · First Unread Post

to have & being

"Of the 22 recorded deaths that have occurred due to accidents that took place on the cricket field in first-class matches, the one that took place at Dhaka 25 years ago remains the only one that involves an Indian player. While we can consider ourselves fortuitous that there has not yet been any such incident of this nature in India, it is a matter of great sadness that a cricketer who wore the national colours met with this tragic fate on foreign soil. Raman Lamba, the former India...Read More...
Hi, Antony George, That's correct. Notice, however, that "to have occurred" is slightly more idiomatic because it is shorter than the relative, and that "being" is the only possible form to be used after a preposition. Otherwise, you should have said: on account of the fact that he was struck ... (which is too wordy).Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Is/remain untreated

Hello there are some adjectives like 'untreated', 'unnoticed' with which 'left', 'stay', 'go' and other verbs are often used. Sometimes we also see 'be' verbs being used. I don't know the rule. I have provided some examples. Could you please explain? 1- The longer depression is untreated/ remains untreated /stays untreated/is left untreated, the more there is a chance of its being dangerous. 2- If cancer is untreated/remains untreated, one could die. 3- Someone sprinkled ink on the bedsheet,...Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, "Remain" and "stay" are better if you want to convey the idea of continuity. Both "go" and "pass" are very idiomatic with "unnoticed."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

"Which" vs 'that'

Is there any difference in meaning? 'That' or 'which' which is correct? 1- Footbal, which is played by over 190 nations, is the most popular sport in the world. 2- Footbal that is played by over 190 nations, is the most popular sport in the world. 3- Footbal, played by over 190 nations, is the most popular sport in the world.Read More...
To add to Ahmed's correct answer (Sundaran's answer is not correct), please note that "football" should end with a double "l." In AmE, the sport in question is called "soccer." The only way in which similar sentences can take a restrictive clause is by using " the football," but note that there should be no comma either before or after the relative clause: - The football that was played in the past was different from the football that is played today. - The football that is played in Europe...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

INVERSION _ " are to + infinitive"

Hello, everybody, According to the website, we can't invert " are to" in the same way as " were to" in conditionals . How should I invert these sentences if not like in the following way: Are we to catch the 14.00 train, we'd better leave now. They'll need to work a lot harder are they to pass the exam. http://random-idea-english.blogspot.com/2013/01/inversion-in-conditionals.htmlRead More...
Heuum, understood. Thank you GustavoRead More...
Last Reply By Meriem · First Unread Post

Tip/Tips

In the procedure document, we wanted to add the word "Tips& Tracks". However, if there is only 1 tip, can I just use singular. e.g. Tip: Make sure you put dash between your first name and last name. I think it is correct, but it sounds like we are giving someone tip$Read More...
Hi, Tony, I think it works.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

at the risk of

Hi, The Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary defines "under pain of" (or "on pain of") as "at the risk of being given a form of punishment" and offers the following example: a. She was ordered to remain silent under pain of imprisonment. But I'm wondering if "under pain of" really means "at the risk of." Does the following work? b. She was ordered to remain silent at the risk of imprisonment. I always thought "at the risk of" is used in the following manner: c. She voiced her opinion at...Read More...
Thank you, Gustavo. Is it possible to paraphrase the following with "at the risk"? a. Businessmen make dangerous politicians because they spend their careers expecting deference on pain of dismissal. b. Businessmen make dangerous politicians because they spend their careers expecting deference at the risk of dismissal to their employees in the event of disobedience.Read More...
Last Reply By raymondaliasapollyon · First Unread Post

Soccer is the....

What does the following sentence mean? - Soccer is the greatest sport ever invented by man. Does it mean 'soccer is the greatest sport that has ever been invented by man.' or does it mean 'soccer is the greatest sport ever that man invented'? Can I also write the following? A- Soccer is the greatest sport ever invented. B- Soccer is the greatest sport that has ever been invented. I know the above two are verbal and personally I would not use them. I would simply say 'soccer is the greatest...Read More...

Who vs whom

I thought I had solved this eternal question, but when I saw a book's comment on the following sentence, I was lost again. Please comment on "I saw who took the last loaf of bread." Should it be "who" or "whom"? and why in the simple way. In other words, without using grammatical terms. (Wed Apr 19, 2023)Read More...
I always try to use "whom" when it is required. But I realize that sometimes it does not sound natural. George: Are you getting married? Sue: Yes, I am. George: Whom are you marrying? ( = "You are marrying whom?" "Whom" is the object of "are marrying.") I think some (most?) Americans would ask " Who are you marrying?" (One reason might be that it takes more effort to pronounce "whom." And another reason is that many native speakers do not know the rule.)Read More...
Last Reply By TheParser · First Unread Post

Being

1) "The accused were being taken to the magistrate before being remanded in custody." 2) "The individuals who were charged with a crime were being transported to the judge's office prior to being detained in prison." In this above sentences, why did the authors use "being" and what is the meaning of it? Is it "VERB" or GERUND or PASSIVE VOICE or PARTICIPLE OR NOUN? I am bit confused about "being" usage in English. Can you explain its all usages in detail? Thanks in advance.Read More...
Hi, Sundaran—Are you again creating a barrage of questions about "being"? We have answered many, many questions about "being" for you in the past. Please study all your threads in detail before asking us to explain in detail all the usages of "being" to you. Why ask us to repeat ourselves over and over?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Being

George, Paddy, and BeeJees all crowded around the radio unable to believe what they were hearing. Is 'being' omitted before 'unable'? like this: George, Paddy, and BeeJees all crowded around the radio being unable to believe what they were hearing. thanks~Read More...
Hi, Sundaran—No, "being" is not omitted; but a comma is. The sentence should read: [They] all crowed around the radio, unable to believe what they were hearing. The "unable"-phrase may be analyzed as a predicate appositive (or supplementive verbless clause) applying to the subject. Compare: George, Paddy, and BeeJees, who were unable to believe what they were hearing, all crowded around the radio.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

rather or quite

Dear Sir, Which option is correct? We like our English teacher.He is ………a good person. a) rather b) quite We have mixed opinions.I think “a” is correct as “rather” has two meanings.When using rather with positive words, it means ‘unusually’ or ‘surprisingly’, particularly in this context, the word ‘person’ is used. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Hi, all, and my greetings from Jeddah Airport, Yes, 'r ather' is mostly used before articles, but it can be used after a/an if there is an adjective. Personally, I prefer 'quite' here, especially, I like Amy's explanation here: https://thegrammarexchange.inf.../quite-fairly-rather BTW, 'Happy Eid Al-Fitr', Abdullah MahrouseRead More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Had

"Padam, who earns Dh5,700 every month, has always had the time, energy, and budget to support needy people in whatever way he can." What is the meaning "HAD" here? I assume the meaning of the "had" is either "held" or "given" or "possessed".Read More...
Thank you, DavidRead More...
Last Reply By Former Member · First Unread Post

’the adapted work’

Hello, everyone, “In A Theory of Adaptation , Linda Hutcheon argues that “An adaptation is not vampiric: it does not draw the life-blood from its source and leave it dying or dead, nor is it paler than the adapted work . It may, on the contrary, keep that prior work alive, giving it an afterlife it would never have had otherwise.” Hutcheon’s refusal to see adaptation as “vampiric” is particularly inspiring for those of us who do work on adaptations.” Which does " the adapted work " refer to,...Read More...
Hi, Gustavo, appreciate your nice example - "Once an adaptation is created, copyright exists in the adapted work .", which is really the strongest evidence to my question!Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

What's the subject in meaning of 'providing the quantity of light'?

Hi What is the subject(in terms of meaning) of 'providing the quantity of light'? that is, which provides the quantity of light that would have required a whole day’s work? or which is modified by 'providing the quantity of light ~'? 1) the subject of 'to work for a fraction of a second', for example, 'you' 'they' 'one' 'a person' or 'people' 2) the preceding to-infinitive clause: 'to work for a fraction of a second so as to be able to afford to turn on an electric lamp or an hour' 3) the...Read More...
Thank you! David and GustavoRead More...
Last Reply By WinD · First Unread Post

Erode vs eroded

Which one is correct? With some verbs I always find this problem. 1- Teeth erode because acids dissolve away part of the enamel surface of your teeth. 2- Teeth are eroded because acids dissolve away part of the enamel surface of your teeth.Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, Both sentences are correct. This is because "erode" can be intransitive (sentence (1)) or transitive (sentence (2), where it is used in the passive). The intransitive is generally used when you focus on the result, irrespective of the agent, while the transitive implies that something or somebody, whether implicit or explicit, causes that effect. Other similar verbs are break, open, close.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

WOULD BE + ing form _ in mixed conditionals

Hello, GE community, Could you explain to me the difference between (1) and (2)? (1) she WOULD NOT BE TAKING care of the children for us next weekend if her business trip had not been cancelled. (2) she WOULD NOT TAKE care of the children for us next weekend if her business trip had not been cancelled. I think grammatically both are correct. But there is a difference semantically speaking that I can't understand clearly.Read More...
Thank you for your answer.Read More...
Last Reply By Meriem · First Unread Post

’the passive forms with the verbs of perception’

Hello, everyone, Though I understand the following verbs are all in the same category – ‘the verbs of perception’, I feel the property of each verb isn’t all the same. So, I wonder which verb the passive forms with “past participle”, “be p.p”, and “being p.p” would be grammatically correct with as in the sentences below; (1a) He saw the team beaten by United. (1b) He saw the team be beaten by United. (1c) He saw the team get beaten by United. (1d) He saw the team being beaten by United. (1e)...Read More...
To create a CR M ( custom er relationship management ) system from scratch , you should first identify the type of data that needs to be collected and determine the appropriate data structure https://mlsdev.com/blog/how-to-build-a-crm . Then , you should develop the functional aspects of the CR M by creating custom work flows , user interfaces , and integration capabilities . Additionally , consider implementing automation tools to stream line processes and reduce the need for manual...Read More...
Last Reply By Migel · First Unread Post

‘Specific to image sharing’

Hello, everyone, “Self-presentation and/or impression management have been long identified as motivators for SNS use. Specific to image sharing , Facebook users choose certain profile pictures to portray themselves as attractive or fun-loving, as popular, or to show their relationship status, which aim to create a particular image of the individual and to shape others' impressions of them. Instagram users also report posting images to express themselves or present a particular image to...Read More...
Hi, David, really appreciate your clarification. I thought the pattern - ' Specific to image sharing ' may be a very perticular one, which I haven't seen so far, considering the name value of the publisher.Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

Being/having/having had

Dear Gustavo/David 1) "I talked about my journey of being fluent in English.' 2) "I talked about my journey of having fluent in English." 3) "I talked about my journey of having had fluent in English." Which sentence is correct among the three sentences and why? Thanks in advance!Read More...
Also, Sundaran, please do not allow others to post under your user name or use the words of others without quoting them (which is plagiarism, a serious matter). Your uncle is welcome to join the forum and post under his own name.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Mixed conditionals _ the difference between the 2nd conditional and the mixed conditional 3rd/2nd

Hello, GE community, I'm wondering what's the exact difference between (1) and (2): 1- If you’d remembered to bring a map, we wouldn’t be lost now. 2- If you remembered to bring a map, we wouldn’t be lost now.Read More...
Heum, perfect. Thank you for this Gustavo .Read More...
Last Reply By Meriem · First Unread Post

Second, third mixed conditionals_ The past simple implies a past situation rather than a present situation

Hello, As far as I know. The past simple used whether in second conditional sentences or second-third mixed conditional usually implies a present hypothetical situation. Is it possible that it can imply a past hypothetical situation? If yes could you give me some examples? I found this example and I think it implies a past situation. What do you think? Example: If I HAD a time machine, I WOULD HAVE GONE back to the 1960s to see the Beatles perform live.Read More...
Yes, it does. After practising some exercises, I can realise this. Thank you Gustavo .Read More...
Last Reply By Meriem · First Unread Post
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