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which one is correct?

the answer is 3 but why? perform is verb and where is the subject in second sentence!?Read More...
Hello, Ehsan, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Thank you for attaching a picture of the exercise you are asking about. In the future, please write out the question in the body of your post, so that reference to the attachment is optional rather than obligatory. Also, we ask that you use thread titles that are descriptive of the grammatical topic of the thread. Since "Is this correct?" could be used for almost any thread on this forum, it is not descriptive. You could use, say, "Where is...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

the meaning as in ...

1) Face has the meaning as in the saying "to lose face". Source: Jan Renkema, Introduction to Discourse Studies, John Benjamin's Publishing Company, Amsterdam/Philadelphia, 2004, p. 24 Link: https://books.google.com/ books?id=9KJXnCaADykC&pg=PA24& dq=%22the+meaning+as+in%22&hl= en&sa=X&ved= 0ahUKEwijm9S0otPjAhUKLKwKHXAtA QgQ6AEINzAC#v=onepage&q=% 22the%20meaning%20as%20in%22& f=false Here is the full passage: "An important source of inspiration in the study of...Read More...

next level henchmen status

The following is an excerpt from the CNN news of July 20. What does “next level henchman status” mean in this context? While temperatures in the area could reach 102 degrees, it'll likely feel even worse: The heat index , or the more accurate temperature your body feels when air temperature and humidity are both factored in, could be as high as 115 degrees, the weather service said. That's simply too hot for lawbreaking, Braintree police said. Committing a crime in this sort of weather is...Read More...
Hi, Fujibei, The article shows that this particular police department has a tendency to label things in colorful, humorous ways. This is the same police department that said that it is "hot as soccer balls out there." That is not a common expression. The meaning seems to be that the weather -- the extreme heat -- is itself doing violence to people. To commit a crime in this heat is to be an accomplice (a henchman) of the heat in "crime" and to take it to the next level (actual crime).Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

don't usually; usually don't

a. I don't usually do it. b. I usually don't do it. Are they both correct? If so, do they have the same meaning? Thanks!Read More...
Hi, Kis, The normal word order is: a. I don't usually do it. We usually place the adverb of frequency before the auxiliary in short answers: c. Do you drink cold tea? / I usually don't . Since (a) is the normal order, any disruption will be interpreted as emphatic. Therefore, in (b) "usually" seems to emphasize "don't."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

one

May I know the meaning of ' one ' in the sentence below? Management discourse is a far more complex and fluid phenomenon, one requiring not just effective use, but management itself.Read More...
Hi, Joshua, In your sentence "one" is a pronoun and, as such, it refers to a noun. I'm not sure the sentence is a good one, but it seems to mean the following: - Management discourse is a far more complex and fluid phenomenon, a discourse requiring not just effective use, but management itself. In order to avoid the repetition of the noun "discourse," we can use the pronoun "one." I don't think the presence of the noun "phenomenon" is advisable, because "one" would seem to refer to...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Keep silent

Does it consider correct? Keep silent or will not be silenced And what we're trying to do is (just through civil disobedience and direct action and) let the whole world, let the international communities realise that how people in Hong Kong will not keep silent / will not be silenced under the suppression of President Xi and the chief Executive Carrie Lam. Thanks.Read More...
Hi, bear_bear, Your question is ungrammatical and meaningless. Are you trying to ask, " Is it considered correct? " If so, you could simply say, "Is it correct?" Each phrase is possible. The meaning is subtly different. If someone will not keep silent, they will not remain silent; they will follow their urge to speak. If someone will not be silenced, then they refuse to be caused to be silent. No one can force them to be silent. The verb phrase "will not be silenced" is passive. The sentence...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

No 'do' for a sentence

Sentence (a) with no 'do', it is correct if no '?' at the end of the sentence. (a) How entrepreneurs act in entrepreneurial management. (b) How do entrepreneurs act in entrepreneurial management ?Read More...
Hi, Joshua, What you are calling sentence (a) is not a sentence; it can be a noun phrase or an embedded question. As a noun phrase, it could be the subject of a sentence: How entrepreneurs act in entrepreneurial management is interesting. And here is an example of that same phrase as an embedded question: I wonder how entrepreneurs act in entrepreneurial management . But "How they act" is not a sentence, declarative or interrogative. If you wish to formulate a question, you need do support...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

<past perfect continuous: had been investigating> or <present perfect continuous: have been investigating>

I have made up two similar examples below. (1) (Suppose that I am talking to my friend about this at night.) Someone stole an expensive watch from my store. For the past six months, the police have been investigating (or had been investigating) the case and trying to figure out who did it. This morning , a witness led them to arrest the thief. (2) (Suppose that I am talking to my friend about this at night.) Someone stole an expensive watch from my store. For the past six months, the police...Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, The present perfect continuous is perfectly natural and correct in (1), and the past perfect would not work. You can't use the past perfect in a clause with "for the past six months," which refers to the past six months leading up to now. Neither the present perfect nor the past perfect works in (2). "For the last six months" refers to a period up to the time of speech, but the third sentence of (2) refers to an event that occurred "last month" which would have brought the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Present Perfect Tense in article !

May I know why did the author use present perfect tense to write the sentence below? The second, represented by Kirzner, has stressed the informational aspects of the entrepreneurial function; his argument is that the entrepreneur has a superior knowledge of market imperfections, that he uses to his advantage. Source: Stevenson, H.H. and Jarillo, J.C., 2007. A paradigm of entrepreneurship: Entrepreneurial management. In Entrepreneurship (pp. 155-170). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg.Read More...
No, it depends on the publication and the style it embraces. Reread my last post.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Thanks /Thanks to

Which is correct? 1 Thanks. Peter, for teaching me English. 2 Thank you, Peter, for teaching me English. 3 I want to say thanks to Hong Kong people for supporting our protests. 4 I want to say thank you to Hong Kong people for supporting our protests. 5 Thanks to the millions of Hong Kong people for joining the demonstrations and protests within past few weeks. Thanks.Read More...
That one doesn't work at all, bear_bear. Correct. Incorrect. You can say: (3a) I want to say thanks to the people of Hong Kong for supporting our protests. Incorrect. You can say: (4a) I want to say thank you to the people of Hong Kong for supporting our protests. Awkward. You can say: (5a) My thanks to the millions of people in Hong Kong for joining the demonstrations and protests within the past few weeks.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

'in' vs without 'in' vs "per"

May I know which sentence is correct? (a) The handout of the slides should be two slides in a page. (b) The handout of the slides should be two slides a page. (c) The handout of the slides should be two slides per page.Read More...
First you said "two slides a/per page." Then you said there was only one page. Now you are saying one slide in one page. You need to decide once and for all what your meaning is. Only then can we help you formulate it in English.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

in view of vs in view that

Is it correct to use 'in view that', instead of ' in view of' ? In view that the BizChannel@CIMB campaign which you have participated has ended, the fees and charges for BizChannel@CIMB as shown in the table below will be applied for all the services and transaction performed on BizChannel@CIMB effective from 21 st July 2019.Read More...
Both are incorrect, Joshua. You can say, "In view of the fact that . . . ." (or "In light of the fact that . . . "). Alternatively, you can say, "Given that . . . ."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Relative Clause

1. Restrictions on one of the committees that monitor/monitors corporate waste disposal were revoked, allowing the committee to levy fines on violators of the disposal laws. The sentence above was taken from page 120 of 'The Princeton Review Reading and Writing Workout for the SAT (3rd Edition)'. The answer picked is 'monitors', with an explanation that we can delete the preposition phrase 'of the committees' and we'll have 'one' as the subject of the sentence. I do not agree with the...Read More...
Thanks so much for the excellent explanation, Mr David. I've attached screenshots of the question and answer pages from the text.Read More...
Last Reply By Yale Wale · First Unread Post

What do you think of (about)~?

Hello, Suppose you are attending a business meeting and someone asks your opinion about a new product. "What do you think of our new product?" Your answer is something unexpected, so everyone wants to hear more about it. Someone says, "What makes you think that way (like that)?" or " How did you come to that conclusion?" My question 1: Do you say "How do you think?" in this situation? My question 2: Is "How do you think?" acceptable in a particular situation in daily conversation, except...Read More...
Thank you, David. Exactly what I guessed. I needed your confirmation. AppleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

Bearing/Bore

ahmad
Hello, everyone, Is the use of bearing/bore correct in the following sentences? 1. The candidates bearing roll numbers 1,2,5 and 7 were shortlisted for the interview. 2. The vehicle bearing registration number SH-1258 was seen in the neighborhood around the time of the accident. 3. The slates that bore such numbers/markings were distributed among the children studying in the school. Thanks.Read More...
Thanks a lot, David and Gustavo.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

impress

Hi, 1. "She tries really hard to impress them." Does it mean that she tries hard to make a good impression on them? 2. Is there any subtle difference between make a good impression on someone and leave a good impression on someone? Thank you very much.Read More...
Hi David, Thank you very much for your correction and answer.Read More...
Last Reply By kuen · First Unread Post

for you to be free

A says: We want to be free. B replies: 1) If you want to be free, the tyrant has to be overthrown. 2) For you to be free, the tyrant has to be overthrown. 3) The tyrant has to be overthrown for you to be free. 4) The tyrant has to be overthrown so that you will be free. Are '1', '2', '3' and '4' all correct in this context? Do they all mean the same? I think in this context '1', '2' and '3' are saying the same thing. '4' seems a bit different to me. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi, I agree with you. In that context, (1), (2), and (3) are correct and are saying the same thing, but (4) is incorrect in that context because it is saying something else. In (1), (2), and (3), the tyrant's being overthrown is presented as a necessary condition of the interlocutors' being free. Sentence (4) does not refer to a necessary condition. It states that something should happen for a certain reason.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

When he (the baby) saw his mother, he (the baby) smiled happily.

Hello, When the baby saw his mother, he smiled happily. When he saw his mother, the baby smiled happily. Of the two sentences above, I think 1 is better than 2, but is there a situation where 2 is preferred? AppleRead More...
OK. Your reply showed I had guessed correctly. Thank you, David. AppleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

Changes were made...

Please let me know if the sentences are correct : 1. Changes were made in the web page. Please review it. 2. Please review the changes done it. Thank you!-Read More...
Hello, 4n4, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. (1) is fine as long as the purpose of the review is to check the web page after introducing the changes. Otherwise, you should say: 1b. Changes were made in the web page. Please review them . I would revise (2) as follows: 2b. Please review the changes made/introduced .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

the definite article

1) He boxes like the boxers of the fifties. 2) He boxes like boxers of the fifties. 3) He boxes like the great boxers of the fifties. 4) He boxes like great boxers of the fifties. Are the sentences grammatical? Is there a difference in the meanings of '1' and '2' and the meanings of '3' and '4'? What is the difference? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi, Yes, all four of those sentences are grammatical, but I think (2) and (4) would sound better with some slight adjustments: (2a) He boxes like a fifties-era boxer. (2b) He boxes like a boxer out of the fifties. (4a) He boxes like a great fifties-era boxer. (4b) He boxes like a great boxer out of the fifties.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

will always play / plays

Which is correct? Why? He will always play / plays well in the competition.Read More...
I'm glad I asked you to write them as separate sentences, bear_bear, because you are making precisely the error that I thought you might be making. But I thought you might know better, since you have been a learner for many years. Sentences (2) and (4) are ungrammatical. Whenever a modal auxiliary verb ( will, would, can, could, shall, should may, might ) is part of the verb phrase, the following verb ( play, score , etc.) must be in base form: " will play ," " will score ." This rule is not...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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