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Since

Since the bridge has been built / will be built / was built, it will help the traffic flow. What is the better choice, please? Thanks!Read More...
Hi, Muh1994, You can chose either "has been built" or "was built." The meaning will be that because the bridge has been/ was built, it will help the traffic flow. Since the bridge has been built, it will help the traffic flow. Since the bridge was built, it will help the traffic flow. If you would like "since" to have a meaning related to time (a completely different meaning), the sentence would need to be changed to something like this: Since the bridge has been built, it has helped the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

tense

Hello, I have two questions about the use of tense. 1) Today, Wichner Industries announced that it ( will be opening) an office in Kuala Lumpur to coordinate its overseas operations. 2) First City Bank assured its customers that it ( will maintain) exceptional service in spite of the ongoing renovations in several branches. Q) I wonder what the difference is if I use simple future tense in the question #1. Q2) I wonder if we can use "would maintain", instead of "will maintain". It seems to...Read More...
Hi, Jiho -- The future simple ("will open") or the future progressive ("will be opening") can be used in (1) and (2) with basically no difference in meaning, and the "will" can be backshifted to "would" in each case: (1a) Today, Wichner Industries announced that it will open an office in Kuala Lumpur to coordinate its overseas operations. (1b) Today, Wichner Industries announced that it would open an office in Kuala Lumpur to coordinate its overseas operations. (1c) Today, Wichner Industries...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

More/much (of) A than B

Greetings. Question 1: It was ____ we had hoped. A.more a success than B.a success more than C.as much of a success as D.a success as much as Key: C I kind of doubt it. I feel that A is also correct. What do you think? Question 2: I made some sentences, which relate to the formulation "more A than B": 1, John is very much (of) a musician. 2, John is not very much (of) a musician. 3, John is too much (of) a musician. 4, John is not too much (of) a musician. 5, John is not as much (of) a...Read More...
OK. And I will take some time to digest.Read More...
Last Reply By Robby zhu · First Unread Post

"Used to + verb" vs "simple past tense"

Hi there, can anyone please tell me the difference between "used to +verb" and "simple past tense"? Which ones of them is correct in the following sentences? 1- When I was a child, I used to play/played in my uncle's garden every day. 2- I lived/used to live in France for five years. Now I live in India. 3- Rabindranath Tagore was a great poet. He won nobel prize in 1913. He composed many songs in Bengali. He used to live/lived at Jorasanko, Kolkata. He did not go to school. He used to...Read More...
Hi, Subhajit123, "used to live" is wrong in (2) because it does not work with definite adverbials like "for five years." In the other cases, both the past simple and the "used to" form work. Note: You should day "He won the (or a ) Nobel prize in 1913."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

How to parse "This is so they can help..."

Greetings! Ligaments connect bones to each other. This is so they can help stabilize the joints and provide structure to the skeletal frame. source:http://solidlifefitness.com/2014/03/16/muscles-tendons-ligaments/ Parsing one: "so they can help..." is predicative. Parsing two: "so" is predicative and there is a "that" omitted, i.e. "This is so (that)they can help stabilize...". That-clause is a result adverbial clause. Which parsing do you think is correct?Read More...
I agree with you that, unlike the other cases David and I dealt with further above in this thread, "so that we could meet her new boyfriend" specifies the "idea of going." Here "idea" means "purpose." In my view, that clause is a subject complement: - What was the idea (= purpose) of going? - The idea (= purpose) of going was so that we could meet her new boyfriend / The idea (= purpose) of going was that .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

of vs in

1. This problem is more difficult than that one. Actually, this is the most difficult problem of the book . 2. Sharks are more dangerous than whales. They are the most dangerous animals of the sea . I am not happy with "of the book, of the sea". Shouldn't they be: in the book, in the sea? (Source: Iran's English Coursebooks, grade 12)Read More...
No, because you cannot say "the sea's most dangerous animals." Instead, you can say "New York's tallest building."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Which one is correct FOUND OUT or FOUND IT OUT?

please help.. Which one is correct and please explain why. I immediately fixed the problem as soon as I found out Or I immediately fixed the problem as soon as I found it out. Someone mentioned that I need to add “it” next to found. Is this correct? Please explain if I should or not add “it” I appreciate your help.Read More...
I appreciate your response. It makes sense to me now. Thank you so muchRead More...
Last Reply By Rose212 · First Unread Post

to know of/about nature

Hello! I've come across the following phrase, "Nothing happens in contradiction to nature, only in contradiction to what we know of it." It's not clear to me why "of" is used here and not "about" . Isn't "of" used when we're just aware of the existence of something or someone without knowing any details, i.e. without having any real knowledge? I would expect to hear, for one, "I'll tell you what I know about nature" and not, "...what I know of nature" . The latter sounds self-contradictory...Read More...
It didn't cross my mind, thank you! I prefer understanding to just memorization. Maybe you know what makes a lottery special? I can think of "the (state/main) lottery".Read More...
Last Reply By Alexey86 · First Unread Post

A vague lyrics

Come up to meet you, tell you I'm sorry You don't know how lovely you are I had to find you Tell you I need you Tell you I set you apart Tell me your secrets And ask me your questions Oh, let's go back to the start Running in circles Coming up tails Heads on a science apart Nobody said it was easy It's such a shame for us to part Nobody said it was easy No one ever said it would be this hard Oh, take me back to the start I was just guessing At numbers and figures Pulling the puzzles apart...Read More...
Hi, Freeguy, Initially when you asked this question, the line made no sense to me whatsoever. Have you considered writing to Coldplay or consulting a Coldplay fan group? This is just a guess, but today I think that perhaps the singer means that their heads are (screwed) on such that each is a science apart from the other. If that grammatical interpretation is correct, the meaning is probably that they process things in life in two completely different ways.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

when you went out

1) I cleaned the windows every day that she was here. 2) I cleaned the windows every day when she was here. Is there a difference between the meanings of the above sentences? I think '2' corresponds to: a) When she was here, I cleaned the windows every day. ============================== 3) I ate an apple every day that you went out. 4) I ate an apple every day when you went out. Is there a difference between the meanings of the above sentences? I think '4' corresponds to: b) I ate an apple...Read More...
Hello, Navi, Sentence (2) could correspond to (a), but it could also correspond to (c): c) She came every day, and I cleaned the windows every day, but I cleaned the windows only during the period of every day which coincided with her being here. I agree. And your meaning (b) is logically parallel to my meaning (c) above.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Tenses

What is the right answer : Prices in the shops (rose - have risen) during the last few years.Read More...
Hello, Emad, "Have risen" (the present perfect) is the correct choice, since "the last few years" refers to a period of time leading up to the present. However, it would be good (more idiomatic) to replace "during" with "over": Prices in the shops have risen over the last few years. If the period of time were not a period of time leading up to the present, but a period wholly in the past, then it would be OK to use "during," and you could use either the simple past or the past perfect:...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

As

What is the rule of "As " in this sentence? As a process over the entire lives of it's members.Read More...
Hi, Youri, Your questions usually lack examples and, when there is an example, you don't mention the source or the example is incomplete, as is the case here. What do you mean by "what is the rule"? If you don't provide more context, it will be hard for us to help you and for you to learn.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Gerund after " to"

Is it correct to use gerund after " to" ?Read More...
Hi, Youri, It is correct when what follows "to" is equivalent to a noun. I invite you and other GE members who might be interested to read an article I wrote about this topic here (click on Descargar -- meaning "Download" in Spanish -- on the first line of the table where it says: AEXALEVI Forum Issue XXXI-DIC-2019, and go to page 9).Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Subject

What is the subject of this sentences? Is it correct to write " There remain " or " there remains"? There remain many reasons for the enmity existing between the two neighboring countries. ThanksRead More...
Yes, it is correct. "there" is a grammatical subject. The real subject is "many reasons for the enmity existing between the two neighboring countries." Since the real subject is too long: - Many reasons for the enmity existing between the two neighboring countries remain . we can use the anticipatory subject "there" or we can split the subject: - Many reasons remain for the enmity existing between the two neighboring countries. We use "remain" (not "remains") because the subject is plural...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

One of the other

Is it true to use "One of the other" in sentences? Can we use "One of the another" or " One of the others" instead? ThanksRead More...
Because " the " is definite and " an other" is indefinite. "the another + noun" is as incorrect as "the a/n + noun": - the boy - a boy - NOT the a boy - the other boy - another boy - NOT the another boyRead More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Apposite

How A can be converted to B? A. Inbreeding is mating between closely related individuals. The extreme condition is self fertilization , which occurs in many plants and some animals. B. Inbreeding is mating between closely related individuals, the extreme condition being self fertilization , which occurs in many plants and some animals.Read More...
Thanks for our help.Read More...
Last Reply By youri · First Unread Post

Which year to associate with "New Year's Eve"?

Does one use the year of which NYE is the last day, or the year of which it is the eve? For example - December 31st, 2019 is New Year's Eve 2019 or New Year's Eve 2020?!? I'm thinking it's the latter, but it gave me pause for thought... Thanks!Read More...
Well, that comma between "Eve" and "2019" makes a big difference.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Usage of article After "a kind of"

Greetings! Sentence: It's a kind of a moderate rebuke to the president, but it won't - as Senator Graham says it won't - it won't stop operations. From: NPR Is there any difference if I drop that article"a"? Because I have read similar phrases like: - A kind of material - A kind of hobby Usually, there isn't an article after "a kind of", no matter whether the noun that follows is count or uncount.Read More...
Great! My doubt has totally been dispelled!Read More...
Last Reply By Robby zhu · First Unread Post

If / provided

Provided/if that woman refused to lend us the money, we would borrow some money from the bank. I think both are right with a little difference in meaning. The author's suggested answer is "provided," but I think both are right. What do you think? Thanks in advance!Read More...
I totally agree. Just like "as long as" and "on condition that," "provided (that)" introduces conditions of a different kind. While "if" introduces conditions of a circumstantial kind (usually enabling the use of "in case" or "in the event that" in its place), "provided (that)" introduces conditions of an obligatory nature (i.e. requirements). Compare: - If (= In case / In the event that) that woman refused to lend us the money, we would borrow some money from the bank. (If that were to...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

I wonder

I am confused about the usage of "I wonder". Among well-known dictionaries, only Oxford Learner's Dictionary use "I wonder if/whether ..." without a question mark at the end of a sentence. Please note that the meaning is: a polite way of asking someone for something (NOT to think about something because you want to know more facts or details about it. In this case, we don't need a question mark, and hopefully, there is a consensus about that.) What's the reason behind this difference? It...Read More...
Right.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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