All Forum Topics

that

A recent study disclosed that money was number seven on such a list. Topping it was satisfaction in performing the job. Obviously, that good feeling one gets from having accomplished something is still man's best reward for his hard labors. But he also needs to know he is doing his job well, and the major deficiency within management today is the failure of telling him so. Does 'that' in red refer to anything specific in front, like 'satisfaction'? Or is it one of these kind? I have that...Read More...

I was coming upstairs

"Angus got up just as I was coming upstairs, and not a word was said." Is it correst to say "I was coming upstairs"? What about "I was going upstairs"?Read More...

over the ages

Over _______, not only demographic factors but technological advances have influences the human diet. a. the ages b. ages Are they both correct? What does that mean? Does it mean 'over a long time'? Thanks!Read More...

wind up/end up

The latest talks on North Korea's nuclear program were set to _______ up Friday with little progress. a. wind b. end Are they both correct? Are there any differences in meaning? Thanks!Read More...

I, for one, ...

In LDOCE, I, for one, ... used to emphasize that you believe something, will do something etc and hope others will do the same. I find the example below OK to be splitted ie between the subject and the main verb: I, for one, find information like this interesting and fun to learn about. But for the one below which is given in LDOCE, I find it hard to read and for other to listen to. I, for one, am proud of the team's effort. Isn't it possible to say: I am , for one, proud of the team's...Read More...

so that + V1

"All government officials wear black to mourn for the princess." Can the sentence be rewritten as "All government officials wear black so that they mourn for the princess."? Do we need "may,will, or can" in front of "mourn"?Read More...

think again

Dear experts, Are THINK AGAIN and GIVE IT A SECOND THOUGHT identical in meaning: Those who think that the trade union movement should take a back seat in the Labor movement should think again. Lawmakers just pass legislation that expands the scope of government and never give it a second thought. Thank you, YuriRead More...

About "shattered"

Can I say, (a) The glass of the display case was shattered to/ into pieces on the floor. (b) There were a few (gun) shots follewed by the loud sound of shattered glass.Read More...

take out / from the cake

Can I Say, (A) She is taking out the cake from the oven. (b) She took the cake out of the oven. (c) She was taking the cake from the oven.Read More...

word order and chronology

Are these sentences correct: 1-Tomorrow, if you go in at two o'clock and come out at five o'clock, through the kitchen window, they won't notice your going in but may notice your coming out. 2-Tomorrow, if you go in at two o'clock and come out at five o'clock, through the kitchen window, they may notice your coming out but won't notice your going in.Read More...

due to/because

Which is correct: 1-The verdict was because there were doubts about his committing the crimes. 2-The verdict was due to the fact that there were doubts about his committing the crimes. 2-The verdict was on account of the fact that there were doubts about his committing the crimes. (I guess it would be simpler in 2 and 3 to use 'due to the doubts....' and 'on account of the doubts....', but I thought I might keep the same structure.)Read More...

had had

It was so cold that he had never had before. Did I use 'had had' correctly? Thank youRead More...

to be charged

He was to be charged battery and assault. Did I use 'to be charged' correctly? Thank youRead More...

W-2 forms

Sometimes instead of saying "a W-2 form," we say "a W-2." How do you write the plural of "W-2"? Is it "W-2's"? "W-2s," or "W-twos." HowardRead More...

Talk Turkey

Talk turkey: means to talk frankly and straightforward. Why was the bird "turkey" chosen? Is there any relation between straightforwardness and the bird turkey?!Read More...

Subjunctive with "it's time"

Today in my advanced grammar class, we were discussing the use of the expression "it's time". The rules in the book said that after "it's time", we can use base form or simple past tense. However, one of the examples used the past progressive. When the students tried to use the past progressive in other situations, I knew it did not work but I couldn't tell them why - HELP!! Examples: It's time he GROW up. (base form) It's time he GREW up. (simple past) It's time I TELL him the truth. (base...Read More...

Whenever - adverb or conjunction?

Hi, please tell me whether the word whenever in the sentence below functions as an adverb or conjunction: Even though she was old and poor, Madam King would help her neighbours whenever she could. Would appreciate it if you could tell me why it functions the way it does. I need to explain it to someone. Thank you very much for your time and trouble. GilbertRead More...

missing [of] ?

The problem with conclusions in both these examples is that there is a confusion between linguistic categories and biological categories. Isn't there an [of] missing between [both and these]?Read More...

pictures or hieroglyphics?

Dear anyone out there right now who can help me, Please read the text below and tell me whether the highlighted parts are right or wrong: As we were going past a wall in the cave, we were surprised to see pictures on it. We took photographs of it . 1 I can't call these pictures hieroglyphics, can I (since it isn't a cave in Egypt)? 2 Is the it in the second sentence correct? Should I use them instead? (It sounds odd because both sentences end with it .) 3 If you were to rewrite this to make...Read More...

pace up and down

Can I say, (a) The three masked men paced up and down outside the bank. (a) The three masked men paced up and down the bank. What does it mean "pace up and down"?Read More...

sit facing

Can I say, (A) He sits facing a big mirror. (why "sit" followed by "facing"? )Read More...

"..."

Has anyone ever encountered a "..." that clearly isn't meant to omit something? Like the following: "I'm not sure what you mean...could you please explain?" It's not an ellipsis--an ellipsis is supposed to have spaces on both sides--and it clearly doesn't have the same function as an ellipsis. It also generally indicates something different from the double-dash. A double dash seems to express that the speaker is knowingly changing the direction of his speech. A "..." seems to express that...Read More...

[combine to form water]

Dear teachers, Thank You very much for all the answers I got from you and other people on the forums. At this time, I'd like to put a seemingly odd question. ------------------------------------------------ Hydrogen and oxygen combine to form water. ------------------------------------------------ In the sentence above, I surely understand that "to form water" is an adverbial. Still, I'm wondering how "to form water" is classified in more detail in the range of adverbials. Could you please...Read More...
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