All Forum Topics

confused

cocoricot
Dear teachers, I don't understand why the two sentences below are different in meaning. 1. I have you confused with someone. 2. I have confused you with someone. Thank you very much.Read More...

be supposed to

cocoricot
Dear teachers, What does "be supposed to" mean in this context? Does it mean "be expected to"? "She was supposed to submit her assignment last Monday." Thank you very much.Read More...

dear or dears?

when adressing the people at a particular depatement, for example at a "customer service" can I say: Dears at the customer service,Read More...

pizza hut?

Is it Pizza "hut" or Pizza "hat"? since the shape looks like as hat? Have a look at this link: http://www.odcpl.com/images/pizza_hut.jpgRead More...

ditch v. trench

In LDOCE: Ditch is: a long narrow hole dug at the side of a field, road etc to hold or remove unwanted water. Trench is: a long narrow hole dug into the surface of the ground. But the difference still a bit vage. Would you help me out to make it clear?Read More...

deadline

cocoricot
Dear teachers, They have a three-o'clock deadline for this work. Does it mean that this work must be finished at three o'clock? Thanks.Read More...

relatives

The River Amur forms the natural border between China and Russia, _______ territoral disputes and armed conflicts have frequently occurred. a. where b. whose Are they both correct? I think they are, meaning respectively a. ... , and there territorial .... b. ... , and their territorial .... Am I right? If not, could you explain some? Thanks!Read More...

wore/was wearing

Hi everyone, Could you tell me whether there is any difference in meaning in the sentences below?: ~ We couldn't see his face because he wore a mask. ~ We couldn't see his face because he was wearing a mask. Thank you very much. GilbertRead More...

The future perfect

cocoricot
Dear teachers. 1. It was ten years that Mrs. Pike started her teaching career in our school. I will say in another way: 2. Mrs. Pike has been teaching in our school for 10 years. Is it the same meaning as (1)? I will add the phrase "at the end of this month "to the sentence (1), does the sentence change like this: 3. It was ten years at the end of this month that Mrs. Pike started her teaching career in our school. 4. Mrs. Pike will have taught in our school for 10 years by the end of this...Read More...

repetition of the last letter

Dear experts, I know there are rules behind the repetion of the last letter in words like "planned, skiing, written, sitting." But I am confused and not sure of the rules. Can you please tell me? Thank you as always.Read More...

Weren't they rich

cocoricot
Dear teacher, "Weren't they rich, they couldn't have gone to the USA for their holiday." Please tell me if I can write the conditional sentence in the negative form in such a way? And the tense I used is correct? Could I use "Hadn't they been rich"? "Hadn't they been rich, they couldn't have gone to the USA for their holiday." Thank you very much.Read More...

by versus with

The window was broken _____ a brick thrown by a hooligan. a) with b) by The answer is "b" (by), according to the key. Do you agree with it? What's wrong with "a" (with) ?Read More...

call to v. call for

when should one use each of the follwoing: call for call to Don't these two sentences mean exactly the same? 1. Call for peace. 2. Call to peace.Read More...

I am taking the bus...

a) How will you get to New York? b) I am taking the bus. I was wondering whether the second sentence is correct or not. If it is correct, could you explain why? I have known that present progress means to describe ongoing activities. However, present progress in the second sentence has to have the future meaning if the second sentence is correct.Read More...

be always verb+ing

A) They are always complaining. B) They always complain. Could you explain a difference between the two sentences? When should I use the first setence instead of the second setence?Read More...

in training

Thank you, Richard and Ismael for your latest comments as regards IN TOW/ON TOW. I presume UNDER TOW is not current in US either. Now when we speak of a horse IN TRAINING, may it mean: 1. being trained OR 2. being in good physical condition Best regards, YuriRead More...

being

A: Isn't it being a lawyer is the most honorable career? B: Yes, it is. Did I use 'being' correctly?Read More...

in tow

Dear experts, May ON TOW replace IN TOW in any of the following contexts: in tow – 1. (of a disabled vehicle) pulled along by the towing vehicle: The broken-down car was taken in tow by a lorry. 2. following or accompanying smb.: Nonchalantly signaling to the doorman to park his car, he disappears into the hotel with the blond in tow. 3. under smb.'s control or guidance: Henry was the person who took me in tow and suffered my impatience with the conservative ways of our established...Read More...
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