All Forum Topics

[to]

There is an art to creating success. Is [to] here a preposition? if not, what then?Read More...

consult

What is the difference between: I need to consult [with] my lawyer. I need to consult my lawyerRead More...

sentence correction

a)Expressing one's emotions can reduce the risk of developong cancer. b)People who occationally shout when they are angry might be healthier than those who don't. c)Those who suppress their emotions are more likely to develop the disease. d) Also, even if they do recover, they tend to more slowly from it. It's a test unit. One of the sentences is not correct. But I can't find it. Help me, please! Thanks!Read More...

It is as well not to

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "It's as well not to get on the wrong side of your teacher." Does this sentence mean? => "It is a good thing that you don't make your teacher angry." Thanks.Read More...

determining vs determined

Patty Schnyder practiced ten hours a day, "determined" to defend her Australian Women's Hardcourt title. I know that a sentence above is correct. I wonder if "determing" could replace "determined". If not, what is the difference between them in terms of meaning?Read More...

ellipsis

Those who suppress their emotions are more likely to develop the disease. a) Also, even if they do recover, they tend to more slowly from it. Is the sentence a) correct? If not, could you explain when an ellipsis occurs after 'to' and when not? Thanks!Read More...

no/none/never

A: Is anyone in your class going abroad this summer vacation? B: _____ that I know of. a. no b. none c. never d. nothing Which is correct? Thanks!Read More...

worth/value

A: Can you help me fill out this customs declaration? B: Sure. Did you pruchase more than $400 ____ of goods? a. value b. worth Which is correct? Thanks!Read More...

reason ~ out of

hi teachers. (1) "Never try to reason the prejudice out of a man . It was not reasoned into him, and cannot be reasoned out." "” Sydney Smith (2)Never try to reason a man out of the prejudice . I think that (2) is grammatically correct. what does "reason A out of B" mean? teach me please.Read More...

not very

Are these sentences correct: 1-He had a not very kind expression on his face. 2-What he said was a not very objective account of how he was brought up. Do we need dashes between 'not', 'very' and the adjective?Read More...

with / of different flavour

Can I say, (a) He sells many kinds of ice cream with / of different flavour. (b) He is selling some sorts of ice cream with different flavour.Read More...

whenever (+ simple present / simple future)

Can Isay, (a) Whenever Ali goes around the neighbourhood, he toots the horn to attract the children's attention. (b) Whenever he come to the neighbourhood, he will toot his horn to attract the children.Read More...

mix something with

Thank you, Rachel and Mr.Micawber for your latest comments! Now, will it be right to assume that MIX SOMETHING UP WITH SOMETHING and MIX SOMETHING WITH SOMETHING are not interchangeable: mix something up with something – mistakenly identify one thing with another: your name with his mix something with something – 1. combine or blend smth. with smth. else (to make a new substance): paint with water 2. carry out different activities at the same time: business with pleasure Thank you, YuriRead More...

sentence correction

The Internet community is a remarkable experiment in action of democracy. Is the sentence correct? If not, could you correct it? Thanks!Read More...

push oneself

Dear experts, Will it be right to assume that PUSH ONESELF can only replace PUSH ONESELF FORWARD in the second context: I really do find it painful to push myself forward to complete strangers, in person, by phone or mail, and say: ˜Read my book, say something ... '. It's much harder to go out when you're single and you really have to push yourself forward. Thank you, Yuri Thank you, YuriRead More...

past/past perfect

The special delivery package _____ by noon yesterday. a. had arrived b. arrived Are they both correct? Are there any differences in meaning? Thanks!Read More...

worth

Diana had to buy fifty pounds worth of salt. In the sentence, is 'fifty pounds of salt' correct? I think it must be 'fifty pounds' of salt'. Am I right? Thanks!Read More...

a not entertaining but

Which are correct: 1-He made a not entertaining but artisitcally innovative film in his youth. 2-He met a not beautiful and yet charming girl at the party. 3-He gave a not brief, and very boring acount of what had happened. 4-He had a not fussy, and easy-going superior at work. In the first two cases, there is a contradiction or a contrast between the first part of the adjectival clause ( 'not entertaining' ; 'not beautiful' ) and the second ( 'artistically innovative' ; 'charming' ). This...Read More...

had

Dear teachers, Do I have to use HAD in the following sentence? I HAD apologized to you several times before I wrote this letter. Thank you. Aneeth PrabhakarRead More...

Do I need her?

Hee, hee... I like the way the topic starter is worded... Please tell me if I need to include the highlighted words in the sentence below: To show his undying love for her , Shah Jahan decided to build a white marble mausoleum in memory of his wife. Many thanks. GilbertRead More...

A cleavage display or cleavage displays

Grateful if you could tell me whether this is correct English ie If all else fails, perhaps cleavage display needs to be revisited. Are these better sentences: Should it not be? If all else fails, perhaps cleavage displays need to be revisited OR If all else fails, perhaps a cleavage display needs to be revisited If a lady is showing too much cleavage then as it is continuing it is a display or displays (because she is giving a display every time she meets someone). Grateful for your commentsRead More...
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