All Forum Topics

each / each of

Can I say, (a) He labelled each bag and priced it each $2. (b) He labelled each of bag with a price. (c) He put the price tags for each book. (d) He labelled each book with price tags of $2. (e) In succession, he labelled each platic bag a price.Read More...

Odd sentence

Still reading 'The Hobbit', and I came across this sentence that doesn't make sense to me: "The elf-host was on the march; and if it was sadly lessened, yet many were glad, for now the northern world would be merrier for many a long day." The basic idea is that the elf-host (the elven king) is marching back home after winning a difficult battle where many elves were lost. But can anyone break the sentence down somewhat for me?Read More...

get

You get a nicer class of people living in this area. (Longman) An interesting use of the verb "get". Does it mean "have (got)" here? Thanks.Read More...

and usage

1- Tall and strong men join our club more readily than others. Doesn't this sentence have two possible meanings: FIRST MEANING: Tall men and strong men join our club more readily than others. SECOND MEANING: Tall strong men join our club more readily than others.Read More...

collocation

Which sounds natural to you native speakers? (1) Careful examination by the doctor of the patient is expected. (2) Careful examination of the patient by the doctor is expected.Read More...

yana yana yaana!

when I was a child, I used to watch cartoons. I sometimes heard the charcters say an interjection which its pronunciation sounds like [yana yana yaaana] or something like that. It was used to show that someone did a trick on someone, or when someone make fun of someone? If could identify the interjection from the sound in brackets, would you please write it?Read More...

walk towards / walked towards to / walked to

Can I say, (a) When Ali walked towards (to)/ walked to the shelf, he saw a suspicious boy finding books.The boy looked nervous and scared. (b) When Ali walked towards the end corner of the library, he saw a boy looked suspicious. He hid the book inside his shirt. He seemed nervous. (c) When Ali walked to the second shelf, he saw a boy trying to hide a book into his shirt nervously.Read More...

head or heard!

In "The Tenderness of Wolves" a novel by Stef Penney, page 21 the following is stated: "When I head the rumble of wheels on the road, I ran to meet him........." Shouldn't it be " heard "?Read More...

eat standing up

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "I am not one of those people who can eat standing up." Could you tell me if "standing up" is considered as an adverb of manner? If so, what kind of the word "standing"? Is it a present participle or a gerund? Does it play a role of an adverb? Thanks.Read More...

to begin with

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "To begin with I did advertisements for TV and film, which was fine but not serious acting." Because "with" is a preposition, it often goes with a noun or a gerund. But in this case it is a clause. Could you please explain to me why? Are there any relations between "to begin with" and "I did advertisements for TV and film"? Thanks.Read More...

colon

John said to his mother: from now on I would not be home late. Can I use a colon in the above sentence? Thank youRead More...

there were those upon whom

But this tender moment, like the rest of the book, is saved from the brink of sentimentality by artfully acerbic touches. Mr. Leleux does point out that " there were those upon whom the charms of our new life were lost: everybody." He jokes about how their inability to marry meant no wedding presents. And he serves up the reaction of Robert's very Texan grandfather to Robert's union with Michael. Right on cue the grandfather comments: "Better a man than a Yankee girl." Could you explain the...Read More...

as

1)"It figures you'd have to die in this town to experience beauty," Mr. Leleux quotes his mother as having said. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/14/books/14masl.html?ref=books 2)Clearly, Paulos is innocent of theology, which he dismisses as a "verbal magic show." http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/13/books/review/Holt-t.html?ref=review Could you explain the meaning "as" in the above sentences? Thank youRead More...

revival

It is a musical revival. Did I use 'revival' correctly? Thank youRead More...

until

Until this morning I ---- never ---- eyes on him. A) had / clapped B) - / clapped C) have / clapped D) was / clapping E) would / have clapped I think the best one is A, but are the other alternatives acceptable with "Until this morning" too?Read More...

by the time

By the time the boss ----, his secretary ---- typing the report. A) had arrived / finished B) arrives / has finished C) has arrived / is finishing D) is arriving / finishes E) arrived / had finished E is the answer, but what about A? If it were had arrived / had finished, then would it be as correct as E? Thanks.Read More...

change into / to?

which is the correct preposition to use after the verb "change", "to" or "into"? If both are correct, is there a difference in their usage?Read More...

reading/to read

What I like best is reading / to read . Which word should I use or is either fine? Many thanks.Read More...

What are you?

What are you? Can the above question be used to express one's feeling towards someone who did something outstanding or extraordinary?Read More...

talk or talked?

Can the following sentence be correct by any means or "talk" must be "talked"? If my friend talk about me behind my back, I would feel sad.Read More...

if/unless

A: How much is the annual fee? B: There's no fee ____ you use a credit card. a. unless b. provided that c. if Are they all correct? If not, could you explain why? Thanks!Read More...

modals

A; Are you ready for the biology test? B: I ________ . I've been cramming for the last three days. a. shall be b. should be c. will have been d. would have been Which is correct? Could you explain some? Thanks!Read More...
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