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of the day

The ridicule ____ upon him by leading scientists of the day. A) is being heaped B) has been heaped C) was heaped Does "...scientists of the day..." refer to a dfinite past time, thus requiring the use of the simple past?Read More...
Well, Jerry. You are right. I've torn the question out of its context. That "the" is supported by the relative clause in the original question. The ridicule that ____ upon him by leading scientists of the day ____ to the novelty of his thinking. A) is being heaped / would testify B) has been heaped / testified C) had heaped / has testified D) was heaping / had testified E) was heaped / testifiesRead More...

horror stories / horror books

Can I say, Thirty-four pupils enjoy reading horror books stories / horror stories / horror books.Read More...
Look at the incredible difference in the numbers. More than 4.5 million hits for horror stories , but only 675,000 for horror books . What do YOU think you should use, Vincent? RichardRead More...

mystery books

Can I say, (i) Twenty pupils like reading adventure stories while forty-five pupils prefer mysteries / mystery. (ii) Twenty pupils like reading adventure stories while forty-five pupils prefer mystery books / mysteries books.Read More...
Yes, that would be fine, too. RichardRead More...

" stopped wake up " or " stopped waking up " ?

Dear Rachel, Would you please tell me whether the following sentence is correct or not? Also , please tell me why ? - When I was on holiday, I stopped wake up early ** I think that " stopped wake up " is wrong grammatically and should be " stopped waking up" ** please let me know your opinion. Waitng for your kind explanation. Thank you very much. SayedRead More...
You are right, Sayed. When you are on vacation, you stop waking up early. This means normally you wake up early, but you don't do that now that you are on vacation. When you go back to work, you will have to start waking up early again. When "stop" means discontinue something, use the gerund form of the verb. We would say stop smoking / stop going to class / stop talking to someone when you are angry at him. On the other hand, when "stop" means stop one thing in order to do another, we would...Read More...

cycling skills

Can I write, Last Sunday, John's father bought a new bicycle for him. One day, he rode on his bicycle to the park. (i) He wanted to show off his cycling skills to his friends. (ii) He wanted to show off his good skills in front of his friends.Read More...
My half-penny: I'd just like to point out that in AmE it's biking skills , not cycling skills . RichardRead More...

simple past x past progressive

We ---- for two years before we even got married. A) courted B) were courting Which one sounds more natural?Read More...
I agree that "had been courting" and "were courting" are almost identical. You could say "We had been courting for two years when we married." In fact, this is perfect. "When" in the sentence is better than "before." Still, though, "we had been courting," I think, signals an end to the courtship, while "we were courting" implies merely an interruption. Don't you think? RachelRead More...

rode throufh / over

Can I write, (a) John rode through / over a pothole and fell from the bicycle. (b) John rode through / over a pothole and accidentally fell off the bicycle. (c) Suddenly, John rode through / over a pothole and fell down from / fell down the bicycle.Read More...
Hmm...that's interesting, Jerry. Quite poetic. It must be a very big pothole! I can picture Evil Knievel riding through a huge pothole. RachelRead More...

about "dry"

Can I say, (a) You can wipe it with the cloth to dry. (b) Wipe it with cloth to let it dry. (c) You can wipe it with the cloth and dry it. (d) Wipe it with cloth and let it dry.Read More...
Of your sentences, Vincent, only (A) is possible. That's because all the other sentences have "let." When you wipe something with a cloth, you cause it to be dry; hence, "let" doesn't work. Jerry's sentence, with "wipe it dry," is the most idiomatic. RachelRead More...

it usage

Are these sentences correct: 1-Which chairs will be placed outside depends on the weather. 2-It depends on the weather which chairs will be placed outside. 3-What we'll do tomorrow depends on the weather. 4-It depends on the weather what we'll do tomorrow. Have the tenses been used correctly in these sentences? Is the punctuation correct in 2 and for or do we need a comma after 'weather'?Read More...
No.'s 1 and 3 are much more natural sounding, Navi. The only time I can see 2 and 4 being used is if the speaker needs to emphasize that part of the idea for one reason or another. But 2 and 4 certainly aren't very natural sounding. The verb forms are fine, and I don't think you need a comma after weather in 2 and 4 -- although I'm not 100% sure of this. RichardRead More...

Narrow vs. broad transcription?

Why is the [BROAD transcription] called [BROAD] though it gives ONLY the phonemic transcription? Why is the [NARROW transcription] called [NARROW] though it gives MORE than the phonemic transcription, it gives [allophonic transcription] as well?Read More...
NOW, it is so clear! Thanks a lot Richard!Read More...

about "one hundred,ninety-eight"

Can I say, (a) Out of one hundred and ninety-eight pupils, sixty-eight pupils like reading. (b) Out of one hundred ninety-eight pupils, sixty-eight pupils like reading. (c) Out of one hundred, ninety-eight pupils, sixty-eight pupils like reading. (d) Out of one hundred and ninety eight pupils, sixty-eight pupils like reading.Read More...
I really don't know why you want to write these numbers out in words. Nobody would do this under normal circumstances. However . . . (a) Fine, except you don't need to repeat "pupils." (b) Okay, but ditto about "pupils." (c) No comma after "hundred"; don't repeat "pupils." (d) You need to place a hyphen between "ninety" and "eight." If you don't, you 90 8 instead of 98. RichardRead More...

tense sequence

---- how words in a language have changed over time. A) Linguistic studies revealed some years ago B) Tribal diversity in Africa demonstrates C) A group of linguists were involved in a special study D) Historical linguists commonly study E) The researchers were impressed The official answer to this standard test item is D, but why would A be wrong?Read More...
Yes, indeed. Linguistic studies REVEAL how words in a language CHANGE over time This "change" is a good change. It now refers to a general, timeless action. RachelRead More...

adventure / adventures stories

Can I say, (a) The most popular type of books read by the pupils are adventure and fairy tales. (b) The most popular type of books read by the pupils are adventure stories and fairy tales stories. (c) he most popular type of books read by the pupils are adventure / adventures books and fairy tales books.Read More...
Type should be plural in all three sentences. Besides that mistake . . . (a) is fine. (b) A tale is a story, so it's redundant to say "tales stories." "Fairy tales" is enough. (c) This is a poorly worded sentence. (b) says the same thing and is well written. RichardRead More...

drinking?

John and Michael were sitting drinking and visiting. What part of speech is [drinking]?Read More...
Please do the following: 1.Go to LDOCE "activator". 2. Type in [coversation]. 3.Press Ok 4.choose NO.1 from the list on the lift. 5. you will find the words[ talk, speak, say, etc, [visit] is the eighth word in the list. I hope this helps!Read More...

from here.

It is a brige down the river from here. Is the sentence correct? above all, why does a preposition 'from' follow an adverb 'here'. I have seen 'from here' many times. Thank youRead More...
Good question, Welkins. "From" in front of "here" is all right. "From" and a few other prepositions can come in front of "here" and "there." Please see this previous posting: https://thegrammarexchange.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f...996028464#1996028464 RachelRead More...

Nouns...countable/uncountable

anamaria
I have a question regarding the sentence: The doctor examined the frost-bitten hands of the explorers. The question is about frost from frost-bitten , is it mass term, general term or singular term?Read More...
"Frost-bitten" is not a noun. It is an adjective. " "Bitten" is the past participle, and when you want to say what kind of bite it is, you can put the agent that did the biting in front: "bitten by frost" becomes "frost-bitten." This adjectival compound now modifies "hands." It doesn't matter whether "frost" is count or noncount in this construction. Normally, "frost" is noncount, but like almost every noncount noun, it is sometimes count. RachelRead More...

please correct grammar in the sencetences

tommy
1. The galaxy Andromeda is the most distance object visible to observers in the Northern Hemisphere. 2. Special lamps are used to hot materials in a chemistry lab. 3. Unlike folk dancers , which are the product of a single culture , ballet is an international an form. 4. Personal taxes for Thais rose gradually since 1980. 5. Sucrose does not taste[b] as [b]sweet as table sugar is . please choose and correct grammar in the sencetencesRead More...
Corrections in capital letters. RachelRead More...

Principle representative or Principal representative

Hi, Oh dear I can't work out what is correct. Is there a difference in meaning? 1. Sentence -- She is the principle representative of the company. 2. Sentence -- she is the principal representative of the company. Which one is correct? Internet searches reveal about equal results for either of the above. Many thanks for your assistance. Cheers, SusanRead More...
Hi Jerry and Richard, Thanks for your input. I did look up a dictionary before I did the posting and thought it should be principal, but then so many people on the internet were using principle and I thought -- perhaps I have missed something and musunderstood. Thank you both for this information which is very reassuring and helpful. Thanks. Cheers, SusanRead More...

present perfect

Hi, Is the use of present perfect ok in this sentence? He hasn't talked to Liza because he broke her DVD. Thanks SchalyRead More...
Yes, it can mean "recently," "lately," so that's fine. The problem I have with the sentence is that we would normally say SHE hasn't talked to HIM because he broke her DVD. After all, she's the one who'd be upset, right? Of course, using since would probably be more natural, Schaly, as Welkins suggests. RichardRead More...

from on high

Then Gandhalf climbed to the top of his tree. The sudden splendour flashed from his wand like lightning, he got ready to spring down from on high right among the spears of the goblins. Is 'on high' a noun because I see a preposition 'from' right in front of it? Thank youRead More...
----- on high, a. at or to a height; above. b. in heaven. c. having a high position, as one who makes important decisions: the powers on high. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/High ----- It's c) in your case, thus: "from on high": "from a high place"Read More...

so though/make out/far beneath

So though he could not see the people in the trees, he could make out the commotion among the wolves and see the tiny flashes of fire, hear the howling and yelping come up faint from far beneath him. 1)What function does 'so' serve? 2)What function does 'though' serve? 3) Does 'make out' mean 'see'? 4)In this case, Are 'far' an adjective and 'beneath' an adverb? Thank youRead More...
3) ---- make out to see and identify with effort or difficulty : DISCERN <you can just make it out from this hill> Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged. ----Read More...
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