All Forum Topics

than / bad

"Black English Vernacular, in this respect, cannot be "bad" any more than Russian is "bad" or Arabic is "bad"." My Qs: Does the red part represent a comparison? If yes, Why wasn't the comparative form "worse" used? If Not, what is the function of "than" then? NB. The word "bad" is already punctuated in the text it was cited from.Read More...
In your sentence, Ismael, the word "bad" is not being compared. What is being compared is the whole clause, "Black English Vernacular....cannot be ˜bad'." The word "bad" is in quotes because the writer does not believe that Black English Vernacular is bad; the author is quoting that some people think that BEV is bad, but it is clear that s/he doesn't. The author compares that sentence with "Russian is ˜bad' or Arabic is ˜bad.' The author could also say "more than" to compare the two clauses.Read More...

A tall man and women came to the party?

A tall man and women came to the party. My question is: Does the adjective [tall] above discribe both the man and the women or it refers ONLY to the man?Read More...
Yes, "tall" would refer to the man, but it is unclear whether or not it refers to "women." The sentence is not a good one. You can say, instead, if both the man and the women are tall: A tall man and some tall women came... If only the man is tall, you can say: A tall man and some women came... RachelRead More...

fine aged whisky

Hi, I need help here. I would like to drink some fine, aged whisky. Should there be a comma after the word fine? Yes if it is a co-ordinate adjective. Fine is an adjective and aged is an adjective. An aged and fine whisky -- I don't think that would work. Am I right? Is it correct with a comma or without one? Thanks for your assistance. Cheers, SusanRead More...
No comma between "fine" and "aged." "Fine" is an adjective of opinion. "Aged" describes "whiskey." They are not coordinate adjectives, and you are correct: "and" doesn't go between them. RachelRead More...

deep structure?

There are two types of structure; deep and surface structure. For the surface structure I found it easy to understand but for the other I didn't yet do. Could you give me an example of [deep strucure]and elaborate on it a bit?Read More...
This is quite a complex topic, Ismael. I've read what it says in Wikipedia, and think that you'll benefit from reading that entry, too. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_structure RichardRead More...

He is an English teacher?

He is an English teacher. 1. Which word should be stressed to mean that the teacher teaches English? 2. Which word should be stressed to mean that the teacher's nationality is English?Read More...
That's a good point, Mister Micawber. On second thought, it would stress the fact that he's a teacher as opposed to being a bricklayer or whatever. Thanks for catching that! He's an ENGlish TEAcher does more clearly refer to this teacher's nationality. RichardRead More...

no otherwise

``Your list of the common extent of accomplishments,'' said Darcy, ``has too much truth. The word is applied to many a woman who deserves it no otherwise than by netting a purse, or covering a skreen. But I am very far from agreeing with you in your estimation of ladies in general. I cannot boast of knowing more than half a dozen, in the whole range of my acquaintance, that are really accomplished.'' Does 'no otherwise' mean 'no difference'? Thank youRead More...
. Here it means 'in no other way/form/manner'. .Read More...

[No shoes, no service]

In summer, there is a notice reads: [No shoes, no service] what does it mean?Read More...
I can only speak about the US on this point, Ismael. There are certain areas of the country, especially coastal, subtropical areas with lots of beaches, where people's dress is very informal. It's not uncommon to see young people (adult men) walking around without shirts in these areas as well as both young men and women walking around either in flip-flops or barefoot. That's why places like eating establishments feel the need to post such signs. Areas of the US where you'd find those signs...Read More...

an estimated

There _____ an estimated 10,000 acupuncturists in the United States. a. is b. are Which is correct? Thanks!Read More...
No, my friend, there's nothing more implied. It's just a quirk of the language, I'm afraid, and Rachel's explanation works well. Treat an estimated as an adjectival phrase used right before a number: e.g., an estimated 400 cities . RichardRead More...

what

1)What did you remeber about the film? 2)What struck you? Are 'what' referred to an object?Read More...
If you mean "Is what the direct object?" it is in No. 1. In No. 2 what is the subject. RichardRead More...

a bunch of us; singular or plural

A bunch of us _____ going to get something to eat after class, so why don't you join us? a. is b. are Which is correct? Are they both correct? Which do you prefer? Do you think it is good as a test unit? We've talked about this kind of topic many times, and almost every time I've been given some frustration. Help me! Thanks!Read More...
Yes, the same rule or usage applies in this case, too. RichardRead More...

from...to

Katmandu, the capital city of Nepal has everything ____. a. from souvenirs, to temples, exquisite cuisine b. from souvenirs, from temples, to exquisite cuisine c. from souvenirs, to temples, to exquisite cuisine Which is correct? Are there any rules here? Thanks!Read More...
My half-penny: In the original stem sentence, there should be a comma after Nepal . RichardRead More...

simple future/future perfect

A: Can you turn in the paper by next Friday? B: Hopefully I ____ it by then. a. will finish b. will have finished Are they both correct? Are there any differences in meaning? Thanks!Read More...
I used the two tenses to show how "by the time" works. In the first sentence, in which you refer to the past, "by the time" is the starting point. Then, to refer to a time more in the past than "by the time you came home," you use the PAST perfect tense. In the second sentence, in which you refer to the future, "by the time" is the starting point. Then to refer to a time more in the future than "by the time you come home" ( time in the future, you use the FUTURE perfect tense. Both the...Read More...

[when] or [where]

"There are many occasion [when] or [where] one word is appropriate in a sentence........." Which one is correct [when] or [where] and WHY?Read More...
Because an occasion means something similar to "time" in your sentence, Ismael, "when" is the appropriate word. If "occasion" means "event," like a wedding, you would use "where," if you don't use "at which": They want a wedding at which / where there will be gigantic displays of flowers in every possible place. While "where" can be used in the sentence above, it is informal. "At which would be better." For most purposes, though, "when" would go well with "occasion." RachelRead More...

raising prices

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "The shops are cashing in on temporary shortages raising prices." I doubt about using "raising prices". I think it should be "to raise prices". Please explain. Thanks.Read More...
The sentence is not correct as it is, Coco. Here's what it should be: The shops are cashing in on temporary shortages BY raising prices. OR Raising prices, the shops are cashing in on temporary shortages. RachelRead More...

none taught, none learned

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "If children start from a values vacuum - with none taught, none learned - They will float at the mercy of circumstance and situation, and their lives will never be their own." Please tell me if "none taught, none learned" means "nothing to be taught, nothing to be learned". Thanks.Read More...
Not exactly. "None taught, none learned" means "none (values) have been taught, none (values) have been learned." The phrase refers to the past here. You can tell that because the author is talking about the background of the children before they float at the mercy of circumstance and situation. RachelRead More...

prefer

1)She prefers reading than playing sports. 2)She prefers reading to sports. Did I use 'prefer' correctly? Thank youRead More...
. The second is OK; the first should read: 1)She prefers reading to playing sports. .Read More...

at

1)Sitting on the train, usually she would stop writting at 59th street station, started at the train station where she worked. 2)She demonstrated her skill at drawing. Did I use 'at' correctly? Thank youRead More...
. Yes, but your first sentence has some other problems. It should read something like this: 1)Sitting on the train, she would usually stop writing at the 59th Street station; she started at the train station where she worked. .Read More...

prepositions or particles?

How to know wether [down, to, away, etc] are prepositions or particles?Read More...
Jerry is correct about learning the meaning of the phrasal verbs and the two- or three-word verb and preposition combinations. How to describe the words that are not verbs in these combinations-- down, to, away, etc. -- causes confusion to many, and not all are in agreement. Ismael and others, you might find this link helpful: https://thegrammarexchange.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f...261008444#3261008444 As well, please click on the internal link in that discussion for a more specific...Read More...

"have or have had"

Dear Teachers, Many of us have or have had grandparents who remember events from their childhood with great accuracy but are unable to remember what happened yesterday. ---------------------------------------------- In the sentence above, I can't fully understand the meaning of the verb phrase "have had." What does that mean? And is the phrase "have had" necessary to the sentence?Read More...
Either you have grandparents now or they died. In that case, you had grandparents. The same holds true for parents. When they are alive, you have parents. When they are dead, you say that you had parents. The present perfect refers to an event that happened repeatedly, that might happen again, that began in the past and continues to the present but may not continue. The descriptions do not apply to having grandparents or parents. RachelRead More...

article

It might be an unnecessary source of friction between parent and child . Why does it not have an article 'a' as 'a parent and (a) child'?Read More...
Yes, you could use or omit the second "a." RachelRead More...

would you like some tea?

hi dear friends: -would you like some tea? -would you like a cup of tea? are both of two sentences correct and formal? what's the difference between them? how do we use "some" with noncountable nouns? can we use 'some',with other liquids like milk and water and juice?Read More...
You can use "some" with plural count nouns -- some boys, some trees, some desks, etc. You can use "some" with noncount nouns -- some coffee, some money, some information. You can use "some" with a singular count nouns, but it is very informal and gives a somewhat pejorative meaning to the noun == some guy, some lady, some kind. RachelRead More...

separated by a common tongue?

"According to George Bernard Shaw, the United States and England are two great nations separated by a common tongue? I wanted to understand what is meant by [separated by a common tongue]?Read More...
George Bernard Shaw is famous for, among other things, his wonderful wit. This statement is a great example of irony, Ismael. You would think that if two countries share the same language, they'd be closer, not more separated because of the common tongue. But since there are so many major differences in culture, attitude, government, etc. between the British and the Americans, Shaw was commenting that it doesn't seem to matter that we speak more or less the same language. So when he said...Read More...

directive tags and statment tags

There sometypes of tag questions that do not end in question marks ie directive tags and statment tags. When are they used?Read More...
We use directive tags as part of a sentence that makes an order, or directive, sound nicer, sweeter, and not so aggressive. For example: This cake would taste even better with a little more sugar in it, right / don't you think? (That's a sweeter way of saying, "Add more sugar the next time you make this cake.") Statement tags are normally used when the speaker is not looking for a response per se. He's letting the listener know that he's aware of something: You didn't get the raise you...Read More...
×
×
×
×