All Forum Topics

has, had, cried

Yesterday, my baby................for a long time. a. has cried b. cried c. had criedRead More...
Hi Ismael, If I may... I would choose (b) as the answer because the sentence has an adverb of time - yesterday. As such, we shouldn't use the present perfect or past perfect forms of the verb: Yesterday, my baby CRIED for a long time. Thanks. Yours busybodily, GilbertRead More...

there be_verb

There are many students in front of the building. Many students are in front of the building. Is there the difference between the two sentences above in terms of meaning? Can you explain about when to use each of them?Read More...
Using "there is" and "there are" is a very usual way to tell about the existence of something. In fact, it is more natural in conversation to say that there are many students in front of the building than to say that many students are in front of the building. The second sentence, beginning with "many students," states the same thing, of course. With this sentence, however, you are not so much describing the existence of the students in front of the building as you are describing the...Read More...

allow not to

Does this sentence make sense? The Internet allows us not to think about time and distance.Read More...
>The Internet allows us not to think about time and distance. IMO, this implies that the Internet reduces the time spent on communications and virtually makes the distances insignificant, thus rendering them less critical for us, and allowing us to forget about them.Read More...

Meaning and Grammar

Regarding sentence structure and sentence meaning... my friend and I have an on going "word of the day" followed by attempts at sentence structure using the word. We tried to tie the last two with the current in our most recent sentence and, well, I think we stumped each other some where between meaning and grammar. Neither of us are by any means "A" students in grammar :> The words are: adamant, opine and mendacious. The sentence attempt: He adamantly opined upon the mendacious child.Read More...
Hello, Jaxxsword! That's a very interesting pastime you guys have! To begin with, I think it's odd to use adamantly with a verb like opine . Adamantly means "determined not to change your opinion," so I don't think it works with this verb. It's like saying, "I'm determined not to change my opinion about my opinion about ..." Now, as to the sentences: Q1 & 2. Without adamantly , the sentences seem fine. The only difference between using the allied preposition on or upon is that on is much...Read More...

To be or not to be.

Hello again, Is the first sentence necessarily incorrect? Is the use of 'to be' essential? (1) "These do not need published" (2) "These do not need to be published" Thanks KimRead More...
Once again, thanks ever so much, Rachel.Read More...

cc as a verb

When you send a copy of an email to someone, we say that you "cc" them. How do we write the past tense of "cc"? Is it "he cc'd me," or is it something different? And, how would we write "cc" in the third person singular, or with the -ing form? HowardRead More...
see - SEED /see - SEED / see - SEE - ing RachelRead More...

as

This is from the Bible. Wives, submit to your husbands, as is fitting in the Lord. Can the word "as" be replaced by relative pronoun "which"?Read More...
This passage from the Bible, in biblical language, means: Wives, submit to your husbands, in the same way as it is fitting to submit to the Lord. With this meaning, "which" to introduce a relative clause does not work. It would have a different meaning. Your statement, Kross, about "which" referring to all of the sentence previous to it, is correct. It does not, however, apply to this sentence. RachelRead More...

participle clause

a)After he finished work, Brett noticed something strange. b)Leaving the office on his way out, a limousine sat in the office parking lot. I know b) is not correct. And here is my correction. a. Leaving the office on his way out, he saw a limousine sit in the office parking lot. b. Leaving the office on his way out, he saw a limousine sitting in the office parking lot. Are they both acceptable? Which is better? Do you have any better sentence? Thanks!Read More...
Your sentence b is the correct one, Kis, but it needs to be tweaked: On his way out of the office , he saw a limousine sitting in the company parking lot. Sentence a doesn't work because of sit . You need to use the -ing form to show that this was happening at that time: On his way out of the office, he saw a limousine (that was) sitting in the company parking lot. RichardRead More...

restricted

Abortion is restricted in some American states. Is "restricted" a verb or an adjective here? Thanks.Read More...
It's a past participle adjective in this context, Curious. Here's an example where it's the passive verb: Abortion is restricted by law in some states. RichardRead More...

is it okay?

The senator's proposal is a good step to drawing attention to the crisis now "facing" our nation's oil and gas producers. Is the location of "facing" ok? I think that the later part of the sentence should be rewritten something like below. ~ attention to the crisis now our nation's oil and gas producers "are facing". What do you think of this?Read More...
Your analysis, even though it takes some of the sentence elements out of context, is okay, my friend, but your premise about the verb face isn't. Here's what the LDOCE Online has to say: face [transitive] If you face or are faced with a difficult situation, or if a difficult situation faces you , it is going to affect you and you must deal with it: Emergency services are facing additional problems this winter. The President faces the difficult task of putting the economy back on its feet. So...Read More...

comma

He's short, fat and bald. He's short, fat, and bald. Are both correct? Thanks.Read More...
I don't know about whether one style is American and the other British, but I do know that both are considered acceptable. My stylistic preference is the second sentence with the comma after fat , and here's my reasoning: For me, a comma separates different segments of a sentence or different words in a sentence. We have three adjectives in this case, all different from one another, all independent really of one another. When I see the comma separating short and fat , I understand they're...Read More...

epidemic / pandemic / endemic

I wanted to know the exact differences between: epidemic pandemic endemicRead More...
a search by epidemic pandemic endemic dictionary at Yahoo, for relevant dictionary pages, and you'll find pages such as: http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=3234Read More...

one need do

Dear experts, Did you have a discussion on the difference between: does one need to do something? need one do something? one need do something one needs to do something Thank you, YuriRead More...
The LDOCE has quite a bit of information about the verb "need." First, all the examples with "need" + a main verb but without "to" are all marked as British English. Then, they give this special usage note. It's like the usage note that Mister Micawber gave us, but organized a little differently: Verb patterns You can say that you need to do something "ยข I need to clean (NOT I need clean) the house. If someone else is going to do something for you, you can say that you need something done or...Read More...

unlike

Could one say: 1-Unlike with John, Jeff's driving took lives. instead of: 2-Unlike John's driving, Jeff's took lives. Could one say: 1-Unlike with John, my mother likes Sally. instead of: 2-My mother likes Sally, unlike John. (My mother likes Sally, but not John.)Read More...
In No. 1, I don't think unlike with works. Since we're contrasting two people's driving styles (using the possessive form to do so), I think only the original works. In No. 2, I think unlike with John can work because we're talking about something that is situational. RichardRead More...

such as what

-He has written some good novels. A-Such as what ? B-Such as which ? C-Such as which novels ? Which of the sentences A, B and C are correct in this context? They are questions uttered in response to the first sentence. I would simply use 'Such as?' but I wanted to see if any of the three sentences are grammatically correct.Read More...
You're right, Navi. Just asking Such as? is fine. But you can also say Such as what? RichardRead More...

Previous or Previously?

Hi, Please, which is correct? (1) It had been said only a few minutes previous. or (2) It had been said only a few minutes previously. Any help would be great. Thanks KimRead More...
Fortunately or unfortunately for the state of the language, it seems that "previous" is also considered an adverb by some, and this is confirmed in this dictionary entry: ----- previous Function: adverb : PREVIOUSLY Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged ----------Read More...
Last Reply By Marius Hancu · First Unread Post

learns/is learning

cocoricot
Dear teachers, I think the simple present should be used in this context but is it possible to use the present progressive? 1. When a person learns to play a musical instrument, he must practice several hours a day. 2. When a person is learning to play a musical instrument, he must practice several hours a day. Thanks.Read More...
"Is learning" is accurate. It means that during the process of learning, a person must practice several hours a day. If you say "when a person learns," you might really mean "when a person has learned." This would mean that the person has completed his or her study, at least up to a certain point. In this case, the main clause should be this: "he must still practice several hours a day." You might say, too, "when a person learns," as you have suggested. Nevertheless. this tense jars me. If...Read More...

To really make him happy

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Can I say: "To really make him happy would be impossible, I think." Thanks.Read More...
Yes, as Jerry states. Maybe you are wondering about whether or not it is correct to split an infinitive. It is. It is particularly correct in this sentence where there would be no other position to place "really." RachelRead More...

just like

Can "just like" replace "just as" in a below sentence? If not, is that because "just like" must be followed by a noun or something? Just as there is a difference in pay between men and women in the workplace, there is a leisure gap between them at home.Read More...
In your sentence, "as" is the conjunction used properly. "Like" is sometimes used instead of "as" in this way, but it is considered very informal. One explanation is found in the American Heritage Dictionary* at the entry for "like": USAGE NOTE Writers since Chaucer's time have used like as a conjunction, but 19th-century and 20th-century critics have been so vehement in their condemnations of this usage that a writer who uses the construction in formal style risks being accused of...Read More...

I think

I think bullfighting should be abolished. (Cambridge) Does "I think" make this sentence a noun clause? Thanks.Read More...
In this sentence, "bullfighting should be abolished" is a noun clause. It is the object of "think." You can change the sentence around to see this: That bullfighting should be abolished is what I think. RachelRead More...

sentence correction

Known less for are the religions of the agriculral communities that preceded Greco-Roman civilization. Could you correct the sentence? Thanks!Read More...
It's fine, Kis, except you need to omit for . Also, the word is agricul tu ral . RichardRead More...
×
×
×
×