All Forum Topics

cycle / rode a bicycle

can i say, (a) He rode on a / rode the bicycle. (b) He cycle a bicycle.Read More...
He rides a motorcycle to go around the housing estate to sell ice cream. We use to/in order to , not for , when we mention the intention a person has. Ali's intention is to sell ice cream and make money. RichardRead More...

those (who) wish to

Is the following sentence correct as it is? If "wish" is a verb, which I think it is, isn't a relative word "who" before "wish" obligatory? The monthly fee for tennis lessons is 50 dollars, and 70 dollars for those wish to take optional golf lessons. AppleRead More...
You are right, Apple, and Ismael is totally correct in his response. Thanks, both of you. RachelRead More...

go-getter

Dear experts, Will it be right to assume that whereas HAVE GET UP AND GO can be used of people, horses and cars: You need to demonstrate, through concrete examples, that you have ˜get up and go'! Firms don't give jobs to people who expect the world on a plate... Steering and agility is great for a vehicle of its size. The performance is sluggish but it still has get up and go when you really need it. BE A GO-GETTER is somewhat different in meaning and only used of men: As it is a sales...Read More...
. Yes, I agree, Yuri. 'Go-getter' can of course be used of women as well, and probably of pets and other intelligent animals. After all,it is derived from 'go and get' or 'fetch'. Go-getters can also be more aggressive than people with get-up-and-go, too, I think. .Read More...

The position of "after"

cocoricot
Dear teachers, To me, both sentences are correct. Is it right? 1. That's the dog we've been looking after. 2. That's the dog after which we've been looking. Thanks.Read More...
In a word, Richard is correct. "Look after" is often described as an inseparable phrasal verb. Here's a previous discussion of phrasal verbs on the Grammar Exchange: https://thegrammarexchange.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f...=652108504#652108504 RachelRead More...

broke out/had broken out

cocoricot
Dear teachers, I doubt about how to report the sentence below. I am not sure if I use the tenses correctly. Our teacher said, "The Second World War broke out in 1939." 1. I used the past perfect. Our teacher said the Second World War had broken in 1939." 2. I keep the tense as it is. Our teacher said the Second World War broke out in 1939." Thanks.Read More...
Using the past perfect is fine: Our teacher said the Second World War had broken out in 1939. This is the more correct version and is preferable in written language. Using the simple past for both verbs is also fine in conversational/ informal language as long as the chronology is clearly understood: Our teacher said the Second World War broke out in 1939. RichardRead More...

improve (in)

1. I want to improve my English. 2. I want to improve in my English. 3. He has improved in English. Can 'improve' be used with 'in'? Are the above sentences correct? Many thanks.Read More...
Thanks for your replies.Read More...

more young people that

Which is correct: 1-There more more young people who participated than old. 2-There more more young people than old who participated.Read More...
Thanks a lot Richard and Rachel, I have to inform you Rachel that the mistakes were quite deliberate. Richard and I were trying to see if we could attract intelligent women's attention by making typos. Apparently it works!Read More...

sounds / press the horns

Can I say, (a) Ali is an ice cream vendor. Whenever he goes around (our) neighbourhood, he will sound (got any words to replace?) the horns to attract the children's attraction. (b) Whenever he goes around the street, he presses the horns to attract the children. (c) Whenever he goes to the street, he sounds his bells.Read More...
(a) Ali is an ice cream vendor. Whenever he goes around our neighborhood, he honks his horns to get the children's attention . (b) Whenever he goes around the street s , he honks his horn to attract the children. (c) Whenever he goes down the street, he rings his bells. RichardRead More...

as long as

The computer is patient and will tirelessly go over the same points for as long as is necessary. Is it correct that a clause(as long as is necessary) is put after "for"? Can you explain why the last part(as long as is necessary) is correct grammatically? What is the subject to Be verb "is" in the last part? That's because the subject looks omitted.Read More...
It's okay to use for in this context because it's quite common to use for before time phrases (e.g., for a long time / for quite awhile ). In the time phrase you're pointing out, you're right in noticing that the subject ( it ) has been omitted before is . In fact, we don't even need is in the phrase: for as long as necessary works fine, too. RichardRead More...

as

All watched as close to one million human beings were killed, slaughtered, raped or maimed in a planned, and systematic campaign of ethnic cleaning. What does the word "as" in the sentence do grammatically? Thank you in advance!Read More...
My half-penny: The reason we the phrase is ethnic cleansing and not cleaning is that cleansing implies not only cleaning something, but also getting rid of impure or bad things and can be used for more than literal cleaning, like inside a house. That's why it's a much more appropriate word for this kind of brutality. RichardRead More...

About "tae kwan Do"

Can I say, (A) The man wears black belt for tae kwan do. (b) He has a black belt in / at / for taekwando . (c) He wears a black belt during Tae Kwan Do class / lesson. (d) He wears a black belt when he is practising tae kwan do.Read More...
(A) The man wears a/his black belt for/during Tae Kwan Do matches/exercises/lessons. (B) He has a black belt in Tae Kwan Do. (C) See (A). (D) He wears a/his black belt when (he is) practicing Tae Kwan Do. RichardRead More...

more/less than I

Hello, This is an explanation taken from a grammar book: Use more...than and less...than to compare uncountable nouns that are unequal in a particular way. More means 'a larger amount of'. Less means 'a smaller amount of'. Examples: 1 I drink more water than coffee. I drink less water than coffee. 2 She has more money than I. She has less money than I. 3 They have more sugar than us but less honey. My questions: A Is the explanation correct? B Example number 2 is also possible with ... than...Read More...
hehehehehehehehehe That's what happens when you're trying to do work after midnight, Gilbert! Glad you caught the momentary dementia. RichardRead More...

I wonder...

Hi, Can you tell me why the first sentence ends with a question mark and the second does not ( taken from the LDOCE): 1 I wonder how James is getting on. 2 I wonder if I might have a glass of water? Also, would the sentence below need a question mark?: I wonder if this could be his Many thanks. GilbertRead More...
You don't need a question mark, right. You could use a question mark if you are speaking tentatively, super-shyly, unconfidently: I wonder if this could be his? RachelRead More...

beyond

One of the books I have (written by a Japanese) has this sentence as an example of the usage of 'beyond': The lecture was impressive beyond description. Does the sentence make sense to you native speakers at all?Read More...
So it's OK. I see. Thanks, Rachel!Read More...

one/any

cocoricot
Dear teachers, "He wants to talk to someone knowledgeable in computers before purchasing one." If I replace "one" with "any", is it fine? Does it mean that "any other computer" and between "one" and "any", which is better? "He wants to talk to someone knowledgeable in computers before purchasing any." ThanksRead More...
"One" is correct, referring to a singular countable noun, "computer." You would use "any" with a noncount noun: He wants to talk to someone knowledgeable in wood flooring / stained glass / concrete/ brick before purchasing any. RachelRead More...

Adjectives without nouns

Hi friends, Adjectives can be used without nouns, as in: 1 The handicapped should be given more opportunities. 2 We donated food and clothing to the orphans . 3 The rich ought to help the poor . Can you tell me why the orphans is considered an adjective? I fail to see it. Sorry for the ignorance. Thank you. GilbertRead More...
Thank you Rachel.Read More...

a

Hi anyone who is currently on the grammar exchange, I just want to quickly check this: Is a necessary in the sentence below?: You have a toothache and so I think you should see a dentist. Thanks. GilbertRead More...
Many thanks, Rachel, for the confirmation. GilbertRead More...

children health

After the flood, many schools remained closed for several days because of the concern about 'children health'. Is it not correct? If not, could you correct it? Thanks!Read More...
The phrase should be "(the) children's health." This is the normal way to form a possessive noun phrase. The appostrophe comes right after the possessor (children). RachelRead More...

...but it's not.

Hello, I thought it was (mine, me, I) but it's not . (I, me, mine) know I had one just like this but the logo is different. Since it doesn't belong to (me, I, mine), it must belong to someone else. In the text on the use of personal pronouns above, are the italicised bits correct and consistent with the tense of the text? Thank you very much for the help. GilbertRead More...
Okey dokey Jerry, Thanks. GilbertRead More...

Fall down [from]

from Vincent Can I say: (a) He fell down / fell down from a rock. What is the difference in meaning?Read More...
(a)He fell off the rotten branches. (b)He fell down from the tree. (c)He fell off the branch of a tree / off a tree branch. RichardRead More...

pizza

CAn I say, (a) He is having a pizza for dinner. (b) He ate a piece / a slice of pizza as his dinner. (c) He had pizza before dinner.Read More...
Tell me something, Vincent. Would you normally say something like (A) or (B) in your native language? Now, there are certain phrases we normally use in English. There may be other ways to express the same ideas, but these phrases are the ones we use as native speakers. The phrases for breakfast / for lunch / for dinner are three of those. You should use them: He is having pizza for dinner. RichardRead More...

take

Today you've got a new teacher taking you... (Cambridge) What does this sentence mean? What does "take" mean here?Read More...
Must be that you have a new teacher who is taking you....someplace. RachelRead More...

production

I found in a book the following: Dedication To my wife, for all she put up with during the production of this book. My Q: Is it OK to use the word " production " with books since I know it is used with films, plays and the like?Read More...
Yes, "production" is good. The word would include the thinking about the book, the actual writing, the agonizing, the discussions with the publisher, addressing the physical format of the book....and more. It is certainly a production! Not everybody would say "production," but some do, and it is perfectly fine. RachelRead More...

ever

This is part of a sentence. If they are "ever" to travel safely to Mars, what does the presence of the word "ever" add to the sentence in terms of meaning? I do not understand what difference the word makes.Read More...
In this use, ever is emphatic, Kross, and simply means at any time . If I paraphrase what you've offered here, I can say something like If at any time in the future they do travel safely to Mars,... RichardRead More...

fell out of

CAn I say, (a) The boy fell off / fell off from (of) the tree. (b) The boy fell from the tree. (c) The boy fell down from the tree. The boy fell down the tree. (d)The boy fell out of the tree.Read More...
You can say He fell down and hurt his arm. RichardRead More...
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